November 2016 OIM News


OIM Update

November 2016

The last few months have been devoted to prayer, confession, and supplication unlike anytime in my life. For the first time since becoming a Believer, I truly considered the tragic possibility that the country where I reside was going to democratically choose socialism over the free enterprise capitalistic model that was envisioned by the formation of a constitutional republic based on Judeo-Christian principles back in 1787. For weeks on end, particularly as the Election Day approached, every morning as I entered into conscientiousness, I found myself crying out for mercy, mercy, and more mercy from our Heavenly Father. For lack of a better example, I frequently recalled the prayers recorded by the Prophet Daniel, as he recognized the timeline laid out by Jeremiah’s prophecies (Jeremiah 25:11-12; 29:10) and interceded for his fellow Jews in Babylonian exile:

“So I gave my attention to the Lord God to seek Him by prayer and supplications, with fasting, sackcloth and ashes. I prayed to the LORD my God and confessed and said, ‘Alas, O Lord, the great and awesome God, who keeps His covenant and lovingkindness for those who love Him and keep His commandments, we have sinned, committed iniquity, acted wickedly and rebelled, even turning aside from Your commandments and ordinances. Moreover, we have not listened to Your servants the prophets, who spoke in Your name to our kings, our princes, our fathers and all the people of the land. Righteousness belongs to You, O Lord, but to us open shame, as it is this day—to the men of Judah, the inhabitants of Jerusalem and all Israel, those who are nearby and those who are far away in all the countries to which You have driven them, because of their unfaithful deeds which they have committed against You. Open shame belongs to us, O Lord, to our kings, our princes and our fathers, because we have sinned against You. To the Lord our God belong compassion and forgiveness, for we have rebelled against Him; nor have we obeyed the voice of the LORD our God, to walk in His teachings which He set before us through His servants the prophets. Indeed all Israel has transgressed Your law and turned aside, not obeying Your voice; so the curse has been poured out on us, along with the oath which is written in the law of Moses the servant of God, for we have sinned against Him. Thus He has confirmed His words which He had spoken against us and against our rulers who ruled us, to bring on us great calamity; for under the whole heaven there has not been done anything like what was done to Jerusalem’” (Daniel 9:3-12).

Needless to say, I certainly do not believe it was my individual prayers which generated the electoral results—but instead the cumulative effect of the millions of other grieving saints, who likewise cried out to our Creator God with unceasing prayers. In so doing, many were led to confess their sin and the sin of their fathers, and plead and implore the Holy One for mercy and compassion (Leviticus 26:42). Thankfully by His grace, the Almighty One gazed down from His Heavenly throne and recognized that there were indeed, many more than the negotiated ten righteous souls of Sodom (Genesis 18:16-33) residing in the United States, who could continue to fulfill God’s work to take the gospel of truth to the nations of the world.

Nevertheless, from my extremely limited perspective of being dangled over the potential abyss of living in a society substantially turned over to the evil inclinations of humanity—such was a frightening and I hope life altering experience for all those who claim to be a part of the Body of Messiah. Consequently in my moments of intercession, I was led to consider many of the Biblical and historical facts which led us to this critical juncture. I have tried to capture these things in this month’s lead article, “A Cultural Crossroad.” Hopefully, as we move forward and have been given a “line extension” in time to advance God’s Kingdom on Earth, the Messianic movement will continue to mature and flourish in anticipation of the Messiah’s return.

Finally, significant progress continues to be made with Messianic Apologetics expanding its outreach via social media. During the past year, J.K. McKee has made efforts to be quite active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. We appreciate your efforts of partnering with us via our ongoing Technology Fund, as we make upgrades to our computer equipment and abilities. The transfer of information from the old Messianic Apologetics website to the new WordPress based site will be completed by the end of the year. We are also pleased to announce that audio teachings are now available via a new Messianic Apologetics channel on both iTunes and Podomatic, which you can download via your iPhone or Android.

Until the Messianic restoration of all things…

Mark Huey


A Cultural Crossroads

by Mark Huey
mark@outreachisrael.net

For those of us living in the United States, the past few months in anticipation of a national election and a new governmental leadership, have been extremely stressful. The free will choice of the American population, given the reported flaws of the final two candidates, created conflict peppered with angst, as well meaning people sought peace in their constitutional right to cast a vote. Personally, for the first time since the turbulent 1960s, I discerned the possibility that a dramatic cultural shift was about to take place. But unlike the naïve God-less teenager—who fifty years ago relied upon whatever the world system or “power of air” (Ephesians 2:2) was broadcasting into the airwaves to influence public opinion—my current perception was different. Instead, after almost forty years of pursuing the Messiah Yeshua with the indwelling Holy Spirit teaching and comforting my soul (John 14:16, 26; 2 Corinthians 1:3-7), I had been blessed with eyes to see and ears to hear the manifestation of spiritual warfare that the Spirit of God was revealing as Election Day approached. In my opinion, the continuation of the American culture, based on Judeo-Christian principles, was palpably threatened. Hence, I believe we were at a critical cultural crossroad—and my heartfelt concern for the future of our country, as the principal world power established to defend the relatively nascent State of Israel, was unlike any apprehension I had ever experienced before. As a result of the sleep-depriving anxiety—like millions of other Believers witnessing the same state of affairs—my primary reaction was to fervently pray for God’s mercy. As I searched the Scriptures and reflected on world history for how God intervened in other crucial times, the following verses came to mind occasionally—as my pleading, beseeching, and supplicating intercession grew:

“Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard your hearts and your minds in Messiah Yeshua” (Philippians 4:6-7).

In addition to interceding intensely for the direction of our country, the annual trek through the Torah cycle providentially had the Book of Deuteronomy being studied during the waning months of the recent campaign season, along with the commemoration of the Fall high holidays. In many regards, the five books of the Torah of Moses can be considered to function as the written “constitution” of Ancient Israel. Deuteronomy or Devarim as the final book, incorporates Moses’ concluding summary and recapitulation of the statutes, laws, and regulations.

This year, when reading and studying through those summary passages—given the political electoral decisions being made in early November, and the real potential for what many were calling a “constitutional crisis” with certain results—the parallels between what was envisioned by the framers of the U.S. Constitution came to mind often. After all, when the founding documents, including the Constitution of the United States, were being drafted and adopted, a significant number of the framers and authors of those documents were influenced by Christian ethics and moral principles, with many being genuine followers of the Messiah. The indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit was evident in many of the hearts of those used to draft the provisions incorporated in the Constitution of the United States of America.

As a result, the generally agreed upon understanding about the fallen nature of humanity, was addressed by establishing a scheme of government which would incorporate balancing mechanisms to keep any one person from gaining too much power. For most assuredly, from previous experience and knowledge about world history, just about everyone in that era understood the universal principle later encapsulated in Lord Acton’s precise definition about power: “power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Hence, provisions were made in the U.S. Constitution that included what are known as “checks and balances” to prevent any one branch of government, or any one individual, from abusing the power that they were to receive.

Perhaps one of the most disturbing aspects of the Fall campaign was the much discussed realization that genuine corruption within the government of the United States had simply become a given among the ruling class. Light was finally being cast on the misdealing hidden in the darkness. Television commentators railed, articles and books were written, and movies and documentaries were produced—which all delved into many of the challenges that beset the candidates of the two primary parties vying for political power. One of the most ballyhooed claims dealt with what was being called absolute self-dealing and corruption by one of the candidates. The evidence of using power and position to enrich oneself was overwhelming, as the ability to prosecute the case was frozen by the judicial system. Nevertheless, the intensity of the campaign was in full bloom this past September.

As the 229th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution took place on September 17th, the Torah portion Shoftim was being considered. In Deuteronomy 16:18-21:9, I discovered one critical area that the framers of the U.S. Constitution did not include when they were drafting the articles for American governance. After all, the founding fathers of the late Eighteenth Century were essentially successful farmers, traders, professionals, businessmen, bankers, doctors, lawyers, or land owners—who did not necessarily envision the problem that money would or could create in the electoral processes of the early Twenty-First Century. For the most part, those involved in governmental activities considered it temporary service to the nation which had been created, and not a permanent status for life. Nonetheless, they did foresee the need to include a provision for impeachment that addressed the problem of bribery in the following oblique way found in Article 2, Section 4 Impeachment:

The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other High crimes and Misdemeanors.

In other words, “bribery” was something that the framers of our Constitution knew the human heart was capable of falling into—along with treason, high crimes, and misdemeanors. Of course even today, the ability to prosecute someone for any of these misdeeds requires considerable legal arguments, to determine exactly what rises to the level of removal from office.

But as I pondered Shoftim portion, I wondered why there was not more consideration for how officials, magistrates, and judges can be so readily influenced by the bribes of others. Perhaps the founders could have been more explicit when it comes to the corruption that can result from monetary bribes, as noted in this passage that reminds us about how bribes pervert justice:

“You shall appoint for yourself judges and officers in all your towns which the LORD your God is giving you, according to your tribes, and they shall judge the people with righteous judgment. You shall not distort justice; you shall not be partial, and you shall not take a bribe, for a bribe blinds the eyes of the wise and perverts the words of the righteous. Justice, and only justice, you shall pursue, that you may live and possess the land which the LORD your God is giving you” (Deuteronomy 16:18-20).

The difference, found in the Torah, was that the judges and officers would be appointed by the various tribal leaders of Ancient Israel, rather than elected democratically as found in the American Constitution. But the universal principle found in the words that “a bribe blinds the eyes of the wise and perverts the words of the righteous,” must be considered. This takes one right back to the fallen nature of humanity. Without getting into all of the details which have led settled law to the “Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission” Supreme Court decision, suffice it to say that the ability for money (or wealth/mammon) to corrupt humans goes right back in the annals of time. In fact, in His Sermon on the Mount, Yeshua addressed the choice that every person, regardless of whether they seek to be a ruler, judge, or public servant, must contend with in life. It all comes down to who or what every person is going to serve, which according to Yeshua is one of two masters:

“No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth” (Matthew 6:24).

Here in very succinct terms, Yeshua explains the great dilemma presented to every person who has ever lived—but most especially issues a challenge to those who would claim to follow Him. Consider the stark reality that if a person in a governmental position does not claim a relationship with the Risen Savior, which gives knowledgeable access to the Creator God—then their allegiance is either to self, or a plethora of other gods, with the misperceived security derived from the acquisition of wealth as a motivational force. But without judging another person’s heart on where he or she stands before the Almighty, observing the actions of a person versus what one says, should give a perceptive person a good idea about just who or what another individual is serving. This wise warning was mentioned by Yeshua, just after speaking about the choice of masters, with the reminder that His followers need to be self-critical in order to avoid hypocrisy:

“Do not judge so that you will not be judged. For in the way you judge, you will be judged; and by your standard of measure, it will be measured to you. Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye” (Matthew 7:1-5).

So with those words taken to heart, our prayers should be consistent for all who seek to rule over us in governmental positions. We are not to judge their motivations, but ask the Holy One to give them wisdom, discernment, and merciful hearts when it comes to making decisions that impact those under their authority.

This is why another passage in Shoftim made so much sense regarding what the Lord expected the kings of Israel to do when they were in power. Here, the Torah was very explicit on how Moses instructed the eventual kings of Israel to maintain their humility once they were elevated to rule:

“When you enter the land which the LORD your God gives you, and you possess it and live in it, and you say, ‘I will set a king over me like all the nations who are around me,’ you shall surely set a king over you whom the LORD your God chooses, one from among your countrymen you shall set as king over yourselves; you may not put a foreigner over yourselves who is not your countryman. Moreover, he shall not multiply horses for himself, nor shall he cause the people to return to Egypt to multiply horses, since the LORD has said to you, ‘You shall never again return that way.’ He shall not multiply wives for himself, or else his heart will turn away; nor shall he greatly increase silver and gold for himself. Now it shall come about when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself a copy of this law on a scroll in the presence of the Levitical priests. It shall be with him and he shall read it all the days of his life, that he may learn to fear the LORD his God, by carefully observing all the words of this law and these statutes, that his heart may not be lifted up above his countrymen and that he may not turn aside from the commandment, to the right or the left, so that he and his sons may continue long in his kingdom in the midst of Israel” (Deuteronomy 17:14-20).

Of course, these instructions were for the kings of Israel who were beholden to the Torah of Moses. In the case of the American president, the U.S. Constitution is the law of the land. But if you take a brief look at this passage, you will note a few values that could be applied to any person who has been elevated to power over others, even in a constitutional republic based on democratic principles. In fact, some of these principles were discretely incorporated into the text of the Constitution, and others adhered to by many of the Presidents who have presided over the United States of America. These include:

  1. Choose a countryman or someone (born American, no foreign born leaders)
  2. Never return to Egypt or its ways (do not return to European monarchial systems)
  3. Do not take additional wives, and avoid interlocking treaties (ancient entanglement with treaties)
  4. Take money or increase wealth (avoid bribery)
  5. Write the Torah with the priests (understand the Constitution)
  6. Read Torah and its statutes daily (appreciate validity of established laws)
  7. Learn to fear the Lord (grave responsibility)
  8. Maintain humility (daily prayer seeking guidance from above)

As you can see, the influence of the Holy Bible had a profound impact on the formation of the American culture and the writing of the U.S. Constitution. I highly recommend you take the time to read an article by Stephen McDowell, entitled, “Noah Webster, God’s Law, and the United States Constitution: The Influence of the Bible on the Development of American Constitutionalism” (accessible online at: http://providencefoundation.com/?page_id=1948), and you can review the unique trail through the many historical documents, ultimately influenced by the Scriptures, distilled into the U.S. Constitution.

When reading through many of these documents, you will find just how close the American culture came to a critical crossroad which would have had incredibly traumatic consequences for the world we live in today. One quoted paraphrase that really caught my attention, was attributed to some post-presidency letters written by Thomas Jefferson regarding the ability for the young nation to prosper and thrive. In those correspondences Jefferson warned of the detrimental effects of a centralized government, combined with the corruption inherent in political circles. Upon reading these comments and references to them by various editorial writers, the state of affairs surrounding the recent election cycle generated serious concern for the direction our country was going to take. Attempting to weave in various prophetic statements found in the Holy Scriptures, just added to the parlor games being debated by God-fearing people from all spiritual persuasions. Needless to say, because I was more familiar with the Holy Scriptures, I focused my energies on prayer, appealing to God for mercy, and His compassion to a people and a nation that I believe still has a unique calling to stand with the Jewish people and the State of Israel.

Thankfully, by the grace of God, the result which occurred during this election cycle has given many hope for the days, weeks, months, and years ahead. Around our home, we have praised the Lord for what we have called a “line extension,” before the End of the Age trauma commences. Quite frankly, I have no good reason for understanding why the Holy One of Israel had so much grace toward His people, other than the cries for mercy! There is no doubt in my mind that there were untold millions of Believers who followed this Scripture to the letter:

“[A]nd My people who are called by My name humble themselves and pray and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, will forgive their sin and will heal their land” (2 Chronicles 7:14).

Surely, millions of God-fearing Americans humbled themselves, and sought the face of the Almighty in fervent prayer. Many confessed their sin and turned from their wicked ways. As a result, the Holy One heard the pleas and cries from Heaven, forgave the sin, and is now in the process of healing our land, the United States of America.

The American cultural crossroad was upon us. We stopped, paused, considered the alternatives, and by the grace of God, chose to return to a path which adheres to Christian principles much more so than the other choice. Now it is time to pray for unity and healing between those who are diametrically opposed in the worldview that was chosen. And while we are at it, continue to pray for the protection of those in governmental leadership—so that the American culture, based on Judeo-Christian principles, will continue to stand with the State of Israel for the foreseeable future.

Let me close with some of the most poignant words regarding how the Creator God sovereignly places various governmental authorities over people, in order to ultimately accomplish His will for humanity. Here in his writing to the Romans, the Apostle Paul summarized how Believers as citizens of a society should conduct their lives. These are words that I have no doubt were certainly being considered when the U.S. Constitution was agreed upon:

“Every person is to be in subjection to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those which exist are established by God. Therefore whoever resists authority has opposed the ordinance of God; and they who have opposed will receive condemnation upon themselves. For rulers are not a cause of fear for good behavior, but for evil. Do you want to have no fear of authority? Do what is good and you will have praise from the same; for it is a minister of God to you for good. But if you do what is evil, be afraid; for it does not bear the sword for nothing; for it is a minister of God, an avenger who brings wrath on the one who practices evil. Therefore it is necessary to be in subjection, not only because of wrath, but also for conscience’ sake. For because of this you also pay taxes, for rulers are servants of God, devoting themselves to this very thing. Render to all what is due them: tax to whom tax is due; custom to whom custom; fear to whom fear; honor to whom honor. Owe nothing to anyone except to love one another; for he who loves his neighbor has fulfilled the law. For this, ‘You shall not commit adultery, you shall not murder, you shall not steal, you shall not covet’ [Exodus 20:13-15, 17; Deuteronomy 5:17-19], and if there is any other commandment, it is summed up in this saying, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’ [Leviticus 19:18]. Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the law. Do this, knowing the time that it is already the hour for you to awaken from sleep; for now salvation is nearer to us than when we believed. The night is almost gone, and the day is near. Therefore let us lay aside the deeds of darkness and put on the armor of light. Let us behave properly as in the day, not in carousing and drunkenness, not in sexual promiscuity and sensuality, not in strife and jealousy. But put on the Lord Yeshua the Messiah, and make no provision for the flesh in regard to its lusts” (Romans 13:1-14).

When you reflect on Paul’s words, in light of the cultural crossroad just reached and the path chosen—all who believe in the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob because of faith in the accomplished work of the Messiah Yeshua should say without reservation: “Hallelujah!” We have seen prayers answered, and accordingly, need to take the reprieve as an opportunity to “put on the Lord Messiah Yeshua, and stop making provision for the flesh—for its cravings” (Romans 13:14, TLV)—so that we might instead further advance God’s Kingdom on Earth, until the Messianic restoration of all things…

October 2016 OIM News


OIM Update

October 2016

As the Fall feasts of the Lord arrived this month, a variety of personal, providential circumstances during the month of Elul could not be ignored. Unexpectedly, the impetus for this series of events began with a bicycle accident that interrupted my 5 or 6 day-per-week eighteen-mile bike ride, designed to burn calories and get a good cardio workout. Thankfully, a broken collarbone from the accident ended up revealing some serious blockage in my heart arteries, during the pre-operation phase, delaying surgery to repair the break. So, during this season of repentance from the first of Elul through Yom Kippur, I have had some time to seriously reflect on not only my heart’s physical condition, but most importantly the intentions and motivations of my spiritual heart.

Initially, while praying about my broken bone—before discovering the arteriostenosis in my heart—I was led to some of the Psalms of King David which speak about how fearfully and wonderfully human beings are made in their mother’s womb:

“For You formed my inward parts; You wove me in my mother’s womb. I will give thanks to You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; wonderful are Your works, and my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from You, when I was made in secret, and skillfully wrought in the depths of the earth; Your eyes have seen my unformed substance; and in Your book were all written the days that were ordained for me, when as yet there was not one of them” (Psalm 139:13-16).

After the discovery of my heart blockage, the focus of my prayers soon added the heart of flesh which was given to me when I was born from above (Ezekiel 11:19; 36:26):

“For I will take you from the nations, gather you from all the lands and bring you into your own land. Then I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be clean; I will cleanse you from all your filthiness and from all your idols. Moreover, I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; and I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. I will put My Spirit within you and cause you to walk in My statutes, and you will be careful to observe My ordinances. You will live in the land that I gave to your forefathers; so you will be My people, and I will be your God” (Ezekiel 36:24-28).

Despite the indwelling power of the Holy Spirit, I was reminded that my heart of flesh still struggles with the old nature, which at times can return even as the sanctification process proceeds. During this present season of repentance, passages like the following came to mind:

“Search me, O God, and know my heart; try me and know my anxious thoughts; and see if there be any hurtful way in me, and lead me in the everlasting way” (Psalm 139:23-24).

This past month, I was invited by a good friend to attend an evangelical Christian men’s retreat via the auspices of the Tres Dias movement, which just happened to conclude on Yom Teruah/Rosh HaShanah. The timing was perfect for this season of reflection, and so I joyfully attended the three day retreat. As a result of the confluence of all these events, I was prompted to write this month’s lead article entitled, “A Messianic Heart,” in order to share what the Lord was showing me through this confluence of circumstances.

Significant progress continues to be made with Messianic Apologetics expanding its outreach via social media. During the past year, J.K. McKee has made efforts to be quite active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. We appreciate your efforts of partnering with us via our ongoing Technology Fund, as we make upgrades to our computer equipment and abilities. This past month, the transfer of information from the old Messianic Apologetics website to the new WordPress based site steadily continues. We are also pleased to announce that audio teachings are now available via a new Messianic Apologetics channel on both iTunes and Podomatic, which you can download via your iPhone or Android.

Advancing His Kingdom, until the restoration of all things…

Mark Huey


A Messianic Heart

by Mark Huey
mark@outreachisrael.net

In recent weeks, circumstances surrounding the physical condition of my heart have led me to research not only information on coronary heart disease, but have also prompted me to consider what it means to have a “Messianic heart” for the Creator God. While it has been enlightening to learn about the physiology of how a physical heart functions and how arteries can become blocked, it has been much more profitable to search my spiritual heart and seek the Lord’s face during the annual season of repentance from the first of Elul to Yom Kippur. Providentially, during those forty days I was introduced to a ministry which displayed unconditional love to the attendees of a three day retreat that concluded on Yom Teruah/Rosh HaShanah or the Feast of Trumpets. The timing “coincidences” were much too obvious for me to ignore. So with renewed vigor from dodging a potential tragedy of a “widow maker” termination of my physical life, the thought of what it means to truly have a Messianic heart, or a heart like Yeshua the Messiah, came frequently into my mind.

Quite frankly, because I have never desired to be a cardiologist, but instead, have devoted a considerable amount of time throughout the past forty or so years to read and study the Holy Bible—I am much more comfortable seeking insight on “the heart” from God’s Word, rather than medical journals. After all, I know that the heart muscle is merely an organ created to pump blood throughout the circulatory system. But since the Hebrew terms for heart, lev and levav, are mentioned nearly 1,000 times in the Tanakh, and the Greek term kardia some 157 times in the Apostolic Writings, in many ways, the Holy Scriptures can be considered a heart manual. I concluded that I could personally gain much more from using this personal “wake up” call to search my own heart, to ascertain if I had the “heart of Messiah,” and was over time being conformed more to His image (Romans 8:29). For most assuredly, the Jewish tradition during the annual forty-day season of repentance accentuated by the Ten Days of Awe culminating on Yom Kippur, is an opportune time to ask the Holy One to search our own hearts, as was emphasized and modeled to Israel by King David and recorded in these Psalms:

“Examine me, O LORD, and try me; test my mind and my heart. For Your lovingkindness is before my eyes, and I have walked in Your truth” (Psalm 26:2-3).

“Search me, O God, and know my heart; try me and know my anxious thoughts; and see if there be any hurtful way in me, and lead me in the everlasting way” (Psalm 139:23-24).

Needless to say, the memory bank of Scriptures which included the word “heart” flooded my mind, as I sought the Father’s face for answers to the many questions I had about my own heart—but most especially the motivations that came forth from within my heart. Of course, many of the Scripture passages which deal with the heart are found in the Psalms and words of King David, who according to Samuel’s comments to King Saul, was a “man after God’s own heart”:

“Samuel said to Saul, ‘You have acted foolishly; you have not kept the commandment of the LORD your God, which He commanded you, for now the LORD would have established your kingdom over Israel forever. But now your kingdom shall not endure. The LORD has sought out for Himself a man after His own heart [ish k’levavo], and the LORD has appointed him as ruler over His people, because you have not kept what the LORD commanded you” (1 Samuel 13:13-14).

One discovers in the interactions between the Prophet Samuel and King Saul, that the young David, who is eventually anointed king over Israel, is not chosen for his appearance or stature. Rather, from the Lord’s perspective—as One who looked upon David’s heart—David was chosen for qualities that only God Himself could truly see:

“But the LORD said to Samuel, ‘Do not look at his appearance or at the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for God sees not as man sees, for man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart’” (1 Samuel 16:7).

The choice by the Holy One to make David the king over Israel—with David notably being a progenitor of the Messiah, the ultimate Son of David—is quite curious, given the testimony found in Scripture about David’s imperfect life. Yet, one can get a glimpse of David’s heart from the wealth of Psalms he composed, where he poured out his heart to the Lord. Perhaps the thing about David’s heart which indicated a strong desire to please God, is the consistent communion that reflected a sincere yearning to repent of anything which impeded his relationship with Him. David’s remorseful and repentant heart can be found in Psalms 32 and 51, purportedly after David was caught in his sin with Bathsheba. When you read these Psalms, hear David’s heart and his desire for restoration, knowing that the Lord had every right to turn His face away and bring just punishment for the iniquities he committed:

A Psalm of David. A Maskil. How blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered! How blessed is the man to whom the Lord does not impute iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no deceit! When I kept silent about my sin, my body wasted away through my groaning all day long. For day and night Your hand was heavy upon me; My vitality was drained away as with the fever heat of summer. Selah. I acknowledged my sin to You, and my iniquity I did not hide; I said, ‘I will confess my transgressions to the LORD’; and You forgave the guilt of my sin. Selah. Therefore, let everyone who is godly pray to You in a time when You may be found; surely in a flood of great waters they will not reach him. You are my hiding place; You preserve me from trouble; You surround me with songs of deliverance. Selah. I will instruct you and teach you in the way which you should go; I will counsel you with My eye upon you. Do not be as the horse or as the mule which have no understanding, whose trappings include bit and bridle to hold them in check, otherwise they will not come near to you. Many are the sorrows of the wicked, but he who trusts in the LORD, lovingkindness shall surround him. Be glad in the LORD and rejoice, you righteous ones; and shout for joy, all you who are upright in heart” (Psalm 32:1-11).

“For the choir director. A Psalm of David, when Nathan the prophet came to him, after he had gone in to Bathsheba. Be gracious to me, O God, according to Your lovingkindness; according to the greatness of Your compassion blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity and cleanse me from my sin. For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me. Against You, You only, I have sinned and done what is evil in Your sight, so that You are justified when You speak and blameless when You judge. Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin my mother conceived me. Behold, You desire truth in the innermost being, and in the hidden part You will make me know wisdom. Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Make me to hear joy and gladness, let the bones which You have broken rejoice. Hide Your face from my sins and blot out all my iniquities. Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me. Do not cast me away from Your presence and do not take Your Holy Spirit from me. Restore to me the joy of Your salvation and sustain me with a willing spirit. Then I will teach transgressors Your ways, and sinners will be converted to You. Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, the God of my salvation; then my tongue will joyfully sing of Your righteousness. O Lord, open my lips, that my mouth may declare Your praise. For You do not delight in sacrifice, otherwise I would give it; You are not pleased with burnt offering. the sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and a contrite heart, O God, You will not despise. By Your favor do good to Zion; build the walls of Jerusalem. Then You will delight in righteous sacrifices, in burnt offering and whole burnt offering; then young bulls will be offered on Your altar” (Psalm 51:1-19).

When you read and meditate upon these Psalms and other Psalms of repentance (such as Psalms 6; 38; 102; 130; 143), you find that being honest with the Holy One of Israel is imperative for revealing the inconsistencies in our hearts. The Lord wants His people to be honest with themselves, and totally transparent with Him in order to receive the forgiveness He freely offers—despite the natural condition of the heart before one is born from above, as noted by the Prophet Jeremiah:

“The heart is more deceitful than all else and is desperately sick; who can understand it?” (Jeremiah 17:9).

However for whatever reasons, despite his recorded sin, King David modeled a significant method of returning to the Almighty, and had a “Messianic heart” which desperately desired communion and intimacy with His Maker throughout his life. Certainly this stellar attribute is one of the primary reasons that the Holy One chose David to be a major ancestor of Yeshua the Messiah.

When one fast forwards to the post-resurrection time, after the early Believers were indwelt with the Holy Spirit, there is some absolute confirmation of this approach to the Holy One by the Apostle John. He succinctly summarizes the need to recognize and admit or confess one’s sin, with the confident knowledge that people will be forgiven and cleansed from all unrighteousness:

“If we say that we have fellowship with Him and yet walk in the darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth; but if we walk in the Light as He Himself is in the Light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Yeshua His Son cleanses us from all sin. If we say that we have no sin, we are deceiving ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say that we have not sinned, we make Him a liar and His word is not in us” (1 John 1:6-10).

There are some serious questions for modern-day Believers who have been given a heart of flesh, and indwelt with the power of the Holy Spirit as promised in Ezekiel 36:26-27:

“Moreover, I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; and I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. I will put My Spirit within you and cause you to walk in My statutes, and you will be careful to observe My ordinances” (Ezekiel 36:26-27).

These questions might include:

  • Do I sincerely want to be a man or woman after God’s own heart?
  • Do I want a “Messianic heart” like King David?
  • Am I willing to be honest with myself (and God), and confess my sin?
  • Am I going to repent of my sin and return to the Holy One with all my heart, soul, mind, and strength?
  • Am I more “Messiah like” (conformed to Yeshua’s image) today than I was a year ago?

One way to ascertain progress on the road to sanctification in the Messiah, is by listening or recalling what comes out of the mouth in conversations, and at different times when the emotions are moved. There is a significant by Yeshua in the Gospel of Matthew that gets to the core substance of the matter. When one truly remembers what words have come out of the mouth over the past year, one should be able to discern the condition of his or her heart. In so doing, one might need to choose to continually circumcise the heart, and stiffen the neck no longer (Deuteronomy 10:16). Here is how Yeshua explained to the religious people of His era what they needed to hear, in order to truly understand the hardness of their hearts and their own self-deception:

“Then some Pharisees and scribes came to Yeshua from Jerusalem and said, ‘Why do Your disciples break the tradition of the elders? For they do not wash their hands when they eat bread.’ And He answered and said to them, ‘Why do you yourselves transgress the commandment of God for the sake of your tradition? For God said, “Honor your father and mother” [Exodus 20:12; Deuteronomy 5:16], and, “He who speaks evil of father or mother is to be put to death” [Exodus 21:17; Leviticus 20:9]. But you say, “Whoever says to his father or mother, ‘Whatever I have that would help you has been given to God,’ he is not to honor his father or his mother.” And by this you invalidated the word of God for the sake of your tradition. You hypocrites, rightly did Isaiah prophesy of you: “This people honors Me with their lips, but their heart is far away from Me. But in vain do they worship Me, teaching as doctrines the precepts of men”’ [Isaiah 29:13, LXX]. After Yeshua called the crowd to Him, He said to them, ‘Hear and understand. It is not what enters into the mouth that defiles the man, but what proceeds out of the mouth, this defiles the man.’ Then the disciples came and said to Him, ‘Do You know that the Pharisees were offended when they heard this statement?’ But He answered and said, ‘Every plant which My heavenly Father did not plant shall be uprooted. Let them alone; they are blind guides of the blind. And if a blind man guides a blind man, both will fall into a pit.’ Peter said to Him, ‘Explain the parable to us.’ Yeshua said, ‘Are you still lacking in understanding also? Do you not understand that everything that goes into the mouth passes into the stomach, and is eliminated? But the things that proceed out of the mouth come from the heart, and those defile the man. For out of the heart come evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, slanders. These are the things which defile the man; but to eat with unwashed hands does not defile the man’” (Matthew 15:1-20).

In this unvarnished explanation to His Disciples, Yeshua detailed how the heart of people can be literally heard in the very words men or women utter. But rather than remember what others have said, think back to the words which have come out of your own mouth that have revealed some hardness of the heart toward others. This introspective self-analysis can be extremely beneficial, if one is truly honest. If there is some recollection of hateful or impure thoughts which manifested as actual words ushering forth from the mouth, then follow the example of King David or the Apostle John. Confess the sin, confident that the Lord will forgive and cleanse the repentant heart from all unrighteousness. If some words were directed at someone within earshot, then take the time to humble yourself and ask the offended person for forgiveness. You will be amazed by the reception of others who might have taken an offense to something which was said inappropriately or in the heat of the moment. In many regards, this exercise will be strengthening your resolve to have a “Messianic heart” that is committed to loving others unconditionally.

Additionally, noting that confessing our sin one to another is beneficial (James 5:16) for physical health and the well-being of the soul, it is also imperative to have a Messianic heart that forgives others for any offense which has been received. Yeshua’s instructions found in Matthew 18 on how to confront others in sin, or resolve conflict between His followers, is concluded by some thoughtful instructions on how to forgive others for any offense they may have committed against another personally. In the summation of the need to forgive from the heart, Yeshua utilizes human examples to emphasize the ultimate forgiveness available from our Heavenly Father:

“Then Peter came and said to Him, ‘Lord, how often shall my brother sin against me and I forgive him? Up to seven times?’ Yeshua said to him, ‘I do not say to you, up to seven times, but up to seventy times seven. For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves. When he had begun to settle them, one who owed him ten thousand talents was brought to him. But since he did not have the means to repay, his lord commanded him to be sold, along with his wife and children and all that he had, and repayment to be made. So the slave fell to the ground and prostrated himself before him, saying, “Have patience with me and I will repay you everything.” And the lord of that slave felt compassion and released him and forgave him the debt. But that slave went out and found one of his fellow slaves who owed him a hundred denarii; and he seized him and began to choke him, saying, “Pay back what you owe.” So his fellow slave fell to the ground and began to plead with him, saying, “Have patience with me and I will repay you.” But he was unwilling and went and threw him in prison until he should pay back what was owed. So when his fellow slaves saw what had happened, they were deeply grieved and came and reported to their lord all that had happened. Then summoning him, his lord said to him, “You wicked slave, I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. Should you not also have had mercy on your fellow slave, in the same way that I had mercy on you?” And his lord, moved with anger, handed him over to the torturers until he should repay all that was owed him. My heavenly Father will also do the same to you, if each of you does not forgive his brother from your heart” (Matthew 18:21-35).

From these few examples, one witnesses how a Messianic heart—one after God’s own heart—confesses sin, seeks forgiveness from sin, repents of sin, and forgives others of sin. Given the intrinsic fallen nature that human beings have inherited from Adam, the only way to overcome our lost estate is to be born from above (John 3:16), and receive the indwelling power of the Holy Spirit. Born again people receive a new heart of flesh that has God’s Torah written upon it as promised in the New Covenant (Jeremiah 31:31-34; Ezekiel 36:25-27). As the Apostle Paul communicated it to the Corinthians, if this monumental transformation has taken place, then people can be regarded as new creatures in the Messiah, serving as His ambassadors with a ministry of reconciliation toward their fellow human beings:

“Therefore from now on we recognize no one according to the flesh; even though we have known Messiah according to the flesh, yet now we know Him in this way no longer. Therefore if anyone is in Messiah, he is a new creature; the old things passed away; behold, new things have come. Now all these things are from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Messiah and gave us the ministry of reconciliation, namely, that God was in Messiah reconciling the world to Himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and He has committed to us the word of reconciliation. Therefore, we are ambassadors for Messiah, as though God were making an appeal through us; we beg you on behalf of Messiah, be reconciled to God. He made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, so that we might become the righteousness of God in Him” (2 Corinthians 5:16-21).

Imagine being the “righteousness of God” in the Messiah, simply because of faith in His accomplished work at Golgotha. If God has forgiven us of our sin, how much more should we forgive others—who whether deliberately or inadvertently, sin against us? But in order to do so, followers of the Messiah must have a Messianic heart that exudes unconditional love without reservation.

Let me conclude these thoughts about a Messianic heart with some words issued by the Apostle Paul, another redeemed sinner, who like King David, was forgiven the sin of murder (Acts 22:4). In his letter to the Philippians are some comments which have always prompted me to continually strive to be everything God has created me to be in the Messiah. In this passage, after earlier in the epistle describing the ultimate humility epitomized by the Lord Yeshua (Philippians 2:5-11), Paul confesses his own lack of confidence in his background and natural abilities:

“More than that, I count all things to be loss in view of the surpassing value of knowing Messiah Yeshua my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them but rubbish so that I may gain Messiah, and may be found in Him, not having a righteousness of my own derived from the Law, but that which is through faith in Messiah, the righteousness which comes from God on the basis of faith, that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death; in order that I may attain to the resurrection from the dead. Not that I have already obtained it or have already become perfect, but I press on so that I may lay hold of that for which also I was laid hold of by Messiah Yeshua. Brethren, I do not regard myself as having laid hold of it yet; but one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and reaching forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Messiah Yeshua. Let us therefore, as many as are perfect, have this attitude; and if in anything you have a different attitude, God will reveal that also to you; however, let us keep living by that same standard to which we have attained” (Philippians 3:8-16).

Instead of relying upon his own strength and human abilities, Paul encourages every Believer to heed his words: “The righteousness that I have comes from knowing Messiah, the power of his resurrection, and the participation in his sufferings. It includes being conformed to his death” (Philippians 3:10, Common English Bible). Paul’s exhortation is to develop a heart just like the Messiah, by continually focusing one’s attention on that goal. Achieving that goal is a lifelong process which comes through pursuing Him with all of one’s heart, mind, soul, and strength on a regular basis. In the annual season of repentance, Messiah followers have ample time to spend reflecting on many aspects of where their hearts are located. If we discover some areas of hardness which need confession, do so believing that forgiveness is available, and that reconciliation with the Father is attainable. If we need to resolve differences with others, do so with a cheerful heart, knowing that this is a part of the ministry of reconciliation that pleases our Heavenly Father. Look to Him and Him alone for the results of any of these acts of humility and contrition.

I am so very thankful for the recent circumstances which have led me to consider just where my heart is Messianic or Messiah-like, and where it is falling short of the goal. I praise my Heavenly Father for being so merciful to me, and orchestrating all of the circumstances of the past month to help me focus on where I currently am in my walk with the Messiah! My prayer is that in so doing, some of the things stated above and the Scriptures cited may be used by the Holy Spirit to inspire others to take the time to take a spiritual inventory on where they are in regard to obtaining a Messianic heart. Hopefully in your own sincere examination, many hearts will be changed for the better, so that whatever heartbeats remain in our numbered days, they will be spent diligently working to advance His Kingdom, until the Messianic restoration of all things…