OIM News

April 2017 Outreach Israel News


OIM Update

April 2017

Late last month the senior director of partner relations for the Joseph Project and I were on a trip to East Texas to meet some people, who have been faithful supporters of that humanitarian aid effort in Israel. When we got back to Dallas, Margaret and John had dinner with us, where they had an opportunity to get better acquainted with our new friend. During our conversation about how the Lord is using the donations of people to minister to the needy in Israel, I was taken aback by the term “restitution” used by John, to describe what he has noted for years in his study of the Holy Scriptures. Since he had recently completed his commentary on 2 Corinthians, the subject of taking offerings from the First Century assemblies of the Mediterranean Diaspora to minister to the saints in Jerusalem, was something he had recently written about. He had noted parallels between the Apostle Paul taking monetary gifts from the Greek and Roman Believers to Jerusalem to bring physical relief to needy Jewish Believers, and how that was a nascent prophetic fulfillment of the wealth of the nations streaming to Zion in the Last Days.

Needless to say, I had never considered the concept of “financial restitution” when reflecting on the prophesied restoration of all things noted in Acts 3:19-21. But I was aware of verses like the following that dealt with the wealth of people and nations:

“And the wealth of the sinner is stored up for the righteous” (Proverbs 13:22).

“Foreigners will build up your walls, and their kings will minister to you; for in My wrath I struck you, and in My favor I have had compassion on you. Your gates will be open continually; they will not be closed day or night, so that men may bring to you the wealth of the nations, with their kings led in procession. For the nation and the kingdom which will not serve you will perish, and the nations will be utterly ruined” (Isaiah 60:10-12).

In addition, when we were discussing the fulfillment of the many prophecies regarding the restoration of Israel and how the past seventy years have seen incredible progress in the Land of Israel, the mention of the concept of “restitution” made me think about God’s perfect justice with the promises He made to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. As a congregation, we had just been through the commemoration of God’s deliverance of the Jewish people, as found in the Book of Esther. I recalled the edict of King Ahasuerus that not only protected the Jews, but allowed them to be enriched by the wealth of Persia:

“In them the king granted the Jews who were in each and every city the right to assemble and to defend their lives, to destroy, to kill and to annihilate the entire army of any people or province which might attack them, including children and women, and to plunder their spoil, on one day in all the provinces of King Ahasuerus, the thirteenth day of the twelfth month (that is, the month Adar)” (Esther 8:11-12).

Contemporaneously, we had just studied through the Book of Exodus with the Passover seder rapidly approaching. As a result, I had a memory flash about what happened to the Israelites when they were preparing to leave Egypt. These verses came to mind, as the distinctive term “restitution” of wealth from the plunder of the Egyptians could conceptually be a repayment for years of bondage in Egypt:

“I will grant this people favor in the sight of the Egyptians; and it shall be that when you go, you will not go empty-handed. But every woman shall ask of her neighbor and the woman who lives in her house, articles of silver and articles of gold, and clothing; and you will put them on your sons and daughters. Thus you will plunder the Egyptians” (Exodus 3:21-22).

Next month, I will be writing an article that addresses God’s Justice and Restitution. This month we have featured an excerpt from the forthcoming book Salvation on the Line: The Nature of Yeshua and His Divinity—Gospels and Acts. It addresses the scene of Yeshua walking on water in Mark 6:45-52 and Matthew 14:22-33, which has key Tanach background in the parting of the Red Sea in the Exodus—in addition to Yeshua speaking forth “I am” and being worshipped.

We want to encourage everyone to download the new Messianic Apologetics app for their iPhone or Android. It is available for free in both the iTunes store and on Google Play!

Because of our growing associations with Messianic Jewish Believers and leaders over the past few years, we will be focusing more efforts on how we can make a substantial contribution to Jewish outreach and evangelism, particularly in the apologetics of the nature of Yeshua, His Messiahship, and Bible difficulties. This is very exciting! Please continue to support our efforts with your financial contributions! Without your offerings and gifts, it would be difficult to dedicate the time and energy to produce our many educational resources.

Thank you in advance for your partnership with our ministry endeavors!

“The LORD bless you, and keep you; the LORD make His face shine on you, and be gracious to you; the LORD lift up His countenance on you, and give you peace” (Numbers 6:24-26).

Shalom and blessings,

Mark Huey


Yeshua Calms the Wind and the Sea, and is Worshipped

by J.K. McKee
editor@messianicapologetics.net

This entry has been reproduced from the forthcoming book
Salvation on the Line: The Nature of Yeshua and His Divinity

“Immediately Yeshua made His disciples get into the boat and go ahead of Him to the other side to Bethsaida, while He Himself was sending the crowd away. After bidding them farewell, He left for the mountain to pray. When it was evening, the boat was in the middle of the sea, and He was alone on the land. Seeing them straining at the oars, for the wind was against them, at about the fourth watch of the night He came to them, walking on the sea; and He intended to pass by them. But when they saw Him walking on the sea, they supposed that it was a ghost, and cried out; for they all saw Him and were terrified. But immediately He spoke with them and said to them, ‘Take courage; it is I, do not be afraid.’ Then He got into the boat with them, and the wind stopped; and they were utterly astonished, for they had not gained any insight from the incident of the loaves, but their heart was hardened” (Mark 6:45-52).

“Immediately He made the disciples get into the boat and go ahead of Him to the other side, while He sent the crowds away. After He had sent the crowds away, He went up on the mountain by Himself to pray; and when it was evening, He was there alone. But the boat was already a long distance from the land, battered by the waves; for the wind was contrary. And in the fourth watch of the night He came to them, walking on the sea. When the disciples saw Him walking on the sea, they were terrified, and said, ‘It is a ghost!’ And they cried out in fear. But immediately Yeshua spoke to them, saying, ‘Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid.’ Peter said to Him, ‘Lord, if it is You, command me to come to You on the water.’ And He said, ‘Come!’ And Peter got out of the boat, and walked on the water and came toward Yeshua. But seeing the wind, he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, ‘Lord, save me!’ Immediately Yeshua stretched out His hand and took hold of him, and said to him, ‘You of little faith, why did you doubt?’ When they got into the boat, the wind stopped. And those who were in the boat worshiped Him, saying, ‘You are certainly God’s Son!’” (Matthew 14:22-33).

The scene of Yeshua walking on water, for advocates of either a high Christology of Yeshua being God, or a low Christology of Yeshua being a created agent of God, obviously indicate that Yeshua possesses significant supernatural power. When the Disciples had gone off on a boat journey across the Sea of Galilee, their Teacher had gone off to pray. The boat was being tossed to and fro, and as the Messiah walked on the water to His Disciples, they thought that they were seeing a ghost or phantasma (Mark 6:49; Matthew 14:26). Yeshua assured them that it is, in fact, Him (Mark 6:50; Matthew 14:27). Peter beckoned to Yeshua, actually getting out of the boat to meet Him, but then started sinking due to his doubt (Matthew 14:28-30). The wind stopped when Yeshua got into the boat, and the water was calmed (Mark 6:51; Matthew 14:32). While having hard hearts (Mark 6:52), not fully recognizing or processing everything, their reaction was one of veneration toward their Master (Matthew 14:33).

Yeshua walking on water is important for Christological evaluation because (1) of the obvious miracle witnessed in Yeshua walking on water, (2) of Yeshua’s identification of Himself to the Disciples in the boat, and (3) the Disciples’ response in venerating Yeshua.

That God has supreme power, over the sea and the waves, is testified by Psalm 77:16-20:

“The waters saw You, O God; the waters saw You, they were in anguish; the deeps also trembled. The clouds poured out water; the skies gave forth a sound; Your arrows flashed here and there. The sound of Your thunder was in the whirlwind; the lightnings lit up the world; the earth trembled and shook. Your way was in the sea and Your paths in the mighty waters, and Your footprints may not be known. You led Your people like a flock by the hand of Moses and Aaron.”

It may indeed be that the sentiment of the Psalmist, “Your way was through the sea, Your path, through the mighty waters; Your tracks could not be seen” (Psalm 77:20, NJPS), could be applied to the ability of Yeshua to walk on the water. Peter, notably, was unable to walk on the water himself, without asking the Messiah to command him to come meet Him (Matthew 14:28). Isaiah 51:9 attests, “Was it not You who dried up the sea, the waters of the great deep; who made the depths of the sea a pathway for the redeemed to cross over?” Yeshua, concurrent with this, walked on the water and had the ability to stop the waters.

More theological attention is notably given to the self-identification statements of the Messiah in Mark 6:50 and Matthew 14:27, which a version like the NASU has as, “Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid.” Significant discussions abound, as the source text has egō eimi, more literally “I am,” and whether or not Yeshua’s self-identification of “I am” is to be associated with the self-identification of the LORD or YHWH in the Tanach, in some key places where the Septuagint Greek translation of the Hebrew has notably employed egō eimi or “I am”:

“God said to Moses, ‘I AM WHO I AM’; and He said, ‘Thus you shall say to the sons of Israel, “I AM has sent me to you”’” (Exodus 3:14).

“‘You are My witnesses,’ declares the LORD, ‘And My servant whom I have chosen, so that you may know and believe Me and understand that I am He. Before Me there was no God formed, and there will be none after Me. I, even I, am the LORD, and there is no savior besides Me. It is I who have declared and saved and proclaimed, and there was no strange god among you; so you are My witnesses,’ declares the LORD, ‘And I am God. Even from eternity I am He, and there is none who can deliver out of My hand; I act and who can reverse it?’” (Isaiah 43:10-13).

In the theophany of the burning bush, the Hebrew ehyeh asher ehyeh, in Exodus 3:14, was translated by the Septuagint as egō eimi ho ōn. In the oracle of Isaiah 43:10-13, where the God of Israel declares Himself to be the One True God and Savior, the Hebrew clause ki-ani hu, “that I am He,” was translated by the Septuagint as hoti egō eimi. It should hardly be surprising that when the source text of the Mark 6:50 and Matthew 14:27, incorporate egō eimi into Yeshua’s dialogue, examiners recognize that there might be a connection with Tanach or Old Testament passages such as Exodus 3:14 and Isaiah 43:10-13—and the self-identification of the LORD or YHWH. And, Yeshua speaking “I am” in Mark 6:50 and Matthew 14:27 is hardly isolated; Yeshua speaking “I am” is associated with His walking on water and calming the waves.

Commentators on both the Gospels of Mark[1] and Matthew have tended to positively weigh some kind of a connection between egō eimi and statements of self-identification appearing in the Tanach or Old Testament. Yet, not all English readers tend to detect egō eimi as being “I am.”

There is a variance of perspectives witnessed among English versions of Mark 6:50: thareite, egō eimi mē phobeisthe, with some having “I am,” and others having “it is I”:

  • “Take heart, it is I; have no fear” (RSV).
  • “Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid” (NIV).
  • “Have courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid” (HCSB).
  • “Take heart! I AM! Stop being alarmed and afraid [Exod. 3:14.]” (The Amplified Bible).
  • “Have courage. I AM! Do not fear” (LITV).
  • “Take courage! I am. Do not be afraid” (TLV).

The variance of approaches for thareite, egō eimi mē phobeisthe is even witnessed in various interlinear resources, as Mounce and Mounce has, “Take courage! It is I. Do not be afraid!”,[2] but with Brown and Comfort having, “Have courage, I am; do not be afraid.”[3] A selection of commentators on the Gospel of Mark, in evaluating the usage of egō eimi in Mark 6:50, have associated it with either the burning bush theophany of Exodus 3:14 or various other statements of the Lord’s or YHWH’s self-identification in the Tanach:

  • E.B. Cranfield: “[egō eimi]: the ordinary Greek for ‘it is I’. It is conceivable that Mark intends his readers to be reminded of the O.T. use of the expression in Exod. iii. 14; Isa. xli. 4, xliii. 10, liii. 6.”[4]
  • Alan Cole: “[I]n answering with the words It is I, Jesus may have been deliberately using the name of God (Ex. 3:14). This would have only increased the awe of the disciples, although it could also have given them a clue as to the true nature of Jesus, if their hearts had not been hardened (verse 50).”[5]
  • Larry W. Hurtado: “It is I: The Greek phrase used here can function simply as a self-identification. But it is used in the OT (e.g., Isa 43:25; 48:12; 51:12;) with special force as a formula for self-description by God, resembling the phrasing in Exod. 3:14 where God first reveals himself to Moses. Note especially how the whole passage in Isa. 51:9-16 is a most interesting background for the sea miracle account here. In Mark the phrase reappears on the lips of Jesus in the trial scene (14:62), and there, also, is probably intended as an allusion to these OT passages.”[6]
  • William L. Lane: “For Mark the event is a theophany, a manifestation of the transcendent Lord who will ‘pass by’ as God did at Sinai before Moses (Ex. 33:19, 22) or on Horeb before Elijah (I Kings 19:11)….The emphatic ‘I’ in verse 50 is ambiguous. It can be understood as a normal statement of identity (‘it is I, Jesus’), but it can also possess deeper significance as the recognized formula of self-revelation which rests ultimately on the ‘I am that I am’ of Ex. 3:14. Not only the immediate context of the walking upon the water but the words with which the emphatic ‘I’ is framed favor the theophanic interpretation. The admonitions to ‘take heart’ and to ‘have no fear’ which introduce and conclude the ‘I am he’ are an integral part of the divine formula of self-revelation (e.g. Ps. 115:9ff.; 118:5f.; Isa. 41:4ff., 13ff.; 43:1ff.; 51:9ff.).”[7]

There is a similar variance of perspectives witnessed among English versions of Matthew 14:27: thareite, egō eimi mē phobeisthe, with some having “I am,” and others having “it is I”:

  • “Take heart, it is I; have no fear” (RSV).
  • “Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid” (NIV).
  • “Have courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid” (HCSB).
  • “Take courage! I AM! Stop being afraid! [Exod. 3:14.]” (The Amplified Bible).
  • “Be comforted! I AM! Do not fear” (LITV).
  • “Take courage! I am. Don’t be afraid” (TLV).

The variance of approaches for thareite, egō eimi mē phobeisthe is also witnessed in various interlinear resources, as Mounce and Mounce has, “Take courage, it is I! Do not be afraid.”,[8] and with Brown and Comfort having, “Have courage, I am [here]. Do not be afraid.”[9] A selection of commentators on the Gospel of Matthew, in evaluating the usage of egō eimi in Matthew 14:27, just as with Mark 6:50, have associated it with either the burning bush theophany of Exodus 3:14 or various other statements of the Lord’s or YHWH’s self-identification in the Tanach:

  • Donald A. Hagner: “[egō eimi], ‘It is I,’ probably had a deeper meaning to Matthew and his readers than the simple self-identification of Jesus that it is to the disciples. In a theophany-like context such as this, the words allude to the definition of the name Yahweh ([egō eimi]=I AM) given in the LXX of Exod 3:14 (cf. Matt 22:32; John 8:58; Mark 14:62) and Isa 43:10; 51:12. God is present uniquely in Jesus.”[10]
  • Leon Morris: “In all three Gospels Jesus identifies himself with the words ‘it is I,’ employing the emphatic pronoun commonly used in the Greek translation of the Old Testament where God is the speaker. The expression is sometimes used in the Old Testament where God is revealing himself, such as ‘I am who I am’ (Exod. 3:14). Its use on the lips of Jesus at this point might perhaps be said to be natural under the circumstances. The disciples were scared and in need of reassurance; it was important that they should know right away that the one they were seeing was no ghost, so Jesus identifies himself. But the expression has overtones of deity, and who but God could walk on the stormy waters?”[11]
  • Michael J. Wilkins: “The disciples may be thinking that some evil spirit is attempting to deceive them. Jesus gives them immediate assurance that he is no deceptive evil spirit but truly their Master: ‘Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.’ The expression ‘It is I’ (lit. ‘I am’) may allude to the voice of Yahweh from the burning bush (Ex. 3:14) and the voice of assurance to Israel of the Lord’s identity and presence as their Savior (Isa. 43:10-13). Throughout this section Jesus continues to reveal his true nature to the disciples, and this powerful statement accords with his miraculous calming of the storm.”[12]

While He was walking on the water, and as He spoke forth “I am,” it is doubtful that the fearful Disciples understood everything that was going on. Only in retrospect of the encounter of Yeshua walking on water, and calming the waves, would they have been able to fully process what they experienced. In his commentary on Matthew, Nolland actually takes the approach that it is sufficient for egō eimi, for the identification of Yeshua to His Disciples, to serve as “It is I.” However, Nolland also concludes that egō eimi does likely involve some Tanach or Old Testament identification of God, given how the Disciples thought that they were witnessing a ghost:

“While an echo of the divine self-naming of the OT is possible, in the context of the emphatic [egō] (‘I’) in [egō eimi] (lit. ‘I am’) is sufficiently accounted for by the need for Jesus to identify himself as himself, over against the possibility that the disciples are encountering a parodying spirit (but perhaps [egō eimi] takes both roles simultaneously).”[13]

In their book Putting Jesus in His Place, Bowman and Komoszewski assert that there are explicit connections intended between the scene of the Messiah walking on water, and the Lord God operating in the parting of the Red Sea for the Ancient Israelites in the Book of Exodus:

“As various scholars, both conservative and liberal, have observed, the Gospel accounts of Jesus walking on the sea allude rather clearly to the account in Exodus 14-15 of the Israelites’ crossing of the Red Sea. The Israelites walked in ‘the midst of the sea’ (Exod. 14:16, 22, 27, 29 NASB) and crossed to the other side (Exod. 15:16). Likewise, the disciples’ boat was ‘in the middle of the sea’ (Mark 6:47 NASB) and they also ‘crossed over’ the sea (Mark 6:53). A strong wind from the east blew across the Red Sea and, close to daybreak, the Egyptians found it increasingly difficult to drive their chariots as they attempted to follow the Israelites (Exod. 14:21, 24-25). Likewise, an adverse wind blew across the Sea of Galilee and, based on the geography, it also would have been blowing from the east; this wind also blew close to daybreak and made it difficult for the disciples to row their boat (Mark 6:48). According to Mark, the disciples had the same problem as the Egyptians: their hearts were hardened (Exod. 14:4, 8, 17; Mark 6:52).

“…Jesus appears…to fulfill the role of a greater Moses and of Yahweh. Jesus’ response to his disciples’ fear encompasses both roles. Moses had told the Israelites ‘Take heart!’ (tharseite, Exod. 14:13 LXX) and Jesus told the disciples the same thing: ‘Take heart!’ (tharseite, Matt. 14:27; Mark 6:50). But then Jesus added, ‘It is I [egō eimi]; do not be afraid!’ (Matt. 14:27; Mark 6:50; John 6:20). This statement echoes statements by the Lord God in Isaiah, where he speaks of a kind of ‘new Exodus’ when the Jews would be restored to their land…{quoting Isaiah 43:1-2, 5, 10, 15-16}…”[14]

Bowman and Komoszewski further associate the activity of the Lord God in the Tanach, with Yeshua the Messiah walking on the water, noting the response of worship to the Son of God, on behalf of the Disciples:

“The most striking aspect of the account, is, of course, Jesus’ actually walking on the sea. In the historical Exodus miracle, the Israelites crossed through the sea but on dry land. In later poetic reflection on this defining moment in Israel’s history, biblical authors pictured God walking on the sea…{quoting Psalm 77:16-20}…

“By walking out to the disciples’ boat on the sea, Jesus demonstrated a mastery over the forces of nature unparalleled among human beings. Moses was merely the human agent through whom the Lord led the Israelites across the dry bed of the Red Sea. Jesus walked across the raging waters of the Sea of Galilee and spoke divine words of assurance and sovereign control to his disciples. No wonder, according to Matthew, the disciples responded by worshiping Jesus and affirming that he was God’s Son (Matt. 14:33).”[15]

In the scene of Yeshua walking on the water, theologians, examiners, and readers who conclude that Yeshua is God, do not make this conclusion only on the basis of the Messiah walking on water as the Lord God is portrayed as being superior to the elements, or the Messiah just speaking “I am.” The response of the Disciples to what took place, is recorded in Matthew 14:33: hoi de en tō ploiō prosekunēsan autō, “And those in the boat worshiped Him” (TLV). While Matthew 14:33 includes a definite employment of the verb proskuneō or “worship,” various versions which are employed in either Messianic Judaism and/or the Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement, indicate that their translators or publishers, are unsure about the kind of veneration issued by the Disciples to Yeshua:

  • “The men in the boat fell down before him” (CJB/CJSB).
  • “And those in the boat paid homage to Him” (Power New Testament).
  • “And those in the boat came and did bow to Him” (ISR Scriptures-2009).
  • “Those who were in the boat came and bowed down before him” (The Messianic Writings).

While it is lexically acceptable to render proskuneō in Matthew 14:33 as “bow down,” is it theologically acceptable? The honor displayed by the Disciples to Yeshua—in spite of them not fully processing all of the events—is religious veneration. Nolland broadly states, “There are those who discover, in their experience of being rescued by Jesus, that in Jesus they encounter God, worship God, and Jesus as the Son of God.”[16] Morris is more assertive, concluding, “The experiences of seeing Jesus walk on the water and then of seeing him call Peter to walk there and of delivering that disciple when his faith failed made a profound impression; as a result they worshipped Jesus…It betokens the worship that should be offered to deity and thus shows us the effect the incident had had on those who saw it all.”[17]

As obvious as it might be, upon Yeshua getting into the boat and the waves being calmed, the Disciples could have all simply quieted themselves and wondered. Or they could have actually been said to have remembered their Israelite ancestors crossing the Red Sea. Instead, they worshipped Yeshua. And how serious is this? If Yeshua is not God, the One who identifies Himself as the “I am,” then to worship Yeshua would be to commit idolatry against the God of Israel. Wellum properly notes how “when Jesus was on earth, he received the praise and worship given to him without ever rebuking the persons who acted in this way (Matt. 14:33; 21:15-16; 28:9, 17; John 20:28; cf. 5:22-23).”[18] Yeshua did not refuse the Disciples’ worship of Him. In his book Jesus and the God of Israel, Richard Bauckham concurs,

“Matthew’s consistent use of the word proskunein, and his emphasis on the point, show that he intends a kind of reverence which, paid to any other human being, he would have regarded as idolatrous. This is reinforced by the fact that his unparalleled uses tend to be in epiphanic contexts (Matt. 2:2, 8, 11; 14:33; 28:9, 17). Combined with his emphasis on the presence of the exalted Christ among his people (18:20; 28:20), Matthew’s use must reflect the practice of the worship of Jesus in the [First Century] church.”[19]

The scene of Yeshua walking on the water, Yeshua declaring Himself to be “I am,” and Yeshua subsequently being worshipped by His Disciples—are together all strong signs of His Divinity. Many people throughout religious history who have concluded that Yeshua the Messiah is God, integrated into the Divine Identity, have not just made this conclusion on the basis of blind religious dogma. If Yeshua were just a created supernatural agent, we would not expect Him to just say “I am” as God at the burning bush, or permit Himself to be worshipped.


NOTES

[1] France, Mark, 273 fn#71 is one who notably takes a negative view of any association of egō eimi in Mark 6:50 with various Tanach statements of the LORD’s or YHWH’s self-identification.

[2] Mounce and Mounce, 156.

[3] Brown and Comfort, 144.

[4] Cranfield, Mark, 227.

[5] Cole, Mark, 180.

[6] Larry W. Hurtado, New International Biblical Commentary: Mark (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1989), 106.

[7] Lane, Mark, 237.

[8] Mounce and Mounce, 58.

[9] Brown and Comfort, 56.

[10] Donald A. Hagner. Word Biblical Commentary: Matthew 14-28, Vol 33b (Dallas: Word Books, 1995), 423.

[11] Morris, Matthew, 382.

[12] Michael J. Wilkins, NIV Application Commentary: Matthew (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2004), 516.

[13] Nolland, Matthew, 601.

[14] Bowman and Komoszewski, pp 204-205.

[15] Ibid., pp 205-206.

[16] Nolland, Matthew, 603.

[17] Morris, Matthew, 384.

[18] Wellum, “The Deity of Christ in the Apostolic Witness,” in The Deity of Christ, 142.

[19] Richard Bauckham, Jesus and the God of Israel (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2008), 131.

March 2017 Outreach Israel News


OIM Update

March 2017

There is something about this time of the year that reminds me of the “seasons of life” which continue in clockwork like fashion, to spring forth life and renewed vigor to pursue the Holy One of Israel. Perhaps it was a recent birthday, coupled with attending a Messianic Jewish conference and a congregational leadership retreat, in consecutive weekends, which all combined to make me reconsider these memorable statements from the Preacher in the Book of Ecclesiastes:

“There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under heaven:
a time to be born and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot,
a time to kill and a time to heal, a time to tear down and a time to build,
a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance,
a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them, a time to embrace and a time to refrain,
a time to search and a time to give up, a time to keep and a time to throw away,
a time to tear and a time to mend, a time to be silent and a time to speak,
a time to love and a time to hate, a time for war and a time for peace”
(Ecclesiastes 3:1-8).

Without getting too philosophical or overly dramatic, there is definitely a personal benefit from taking some “time of reflection,” to simply meditate upon God’s Word, as the Holy Spirit brings it to mind. In this case, I have been reminded of the timely cycles or events of life that occur for every soul on the planet we call home.

Thankfully, for those inclined to follow the Torah reading patterns established by the Jewish Sages, to inculcate every generation with the wisdom found in the instruction given to Moses, there are annual reminders of the Almighty’s faithfulness to His people. Consequently this month, we conclude the Book of Exodus, reconsidering the deliverance of Israel from bondage in Egypt, and when they receive the nascent instructions on how to establish the holy nation of priests:

“Now then, if you will indeed obey My voice and keep My covenant, then you shall be My own possession among all the peoples, for all the earth is Mine; and you shall be to Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation. These are the words that you shall speak to the sons of Israel” (Exodus 19:5-6).

In addition this month, our methodical study of the miraculous Exodus events is interspersed with another deliverance story, when the Book of Esther is considered and Purim or the Feast of Lots is celebrated. Once again, the Creator God demonstrated His sovereign will for the children of Israel, as they avoided potential annihilation from the ancient Persian Empire. So, it is extremely important for modern-day followers of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to reflect upon the “times and seasons” of life found in the Holy Scriptures, being continually cognizant of the ancient and modern realities of Israel’s (and God’s) persistent foes. After all, the obstinate Enemy of our souls has always used people like the Amalekites to destroy those who have been called to bring the light of truth. In fact, it is clearly stated that after Moses declared the Holy One as a banner over Israel, the harassment from the Amalekites will continue forever:

“Moses built an altar and named it The LORD is My Banner; and he said, ‘The LORD has sworn; the LORD will have war against Amalek from generation to generation’” (Exodus 17:15-16).

Therefore, let us all be persistent in our intercessory prayers, as we reflect upon historical occurrences, and present realities! 2017 is a year of significant anniversaries for the State of Israel and the liberation of Jerusalem, which will keep Israel in the media focus throughout the year. It is our fervent prayer that despite the attempts of nefarious interests to do harm to Israel, we will all redouble our prayers for protection for those in positions to lend help and security. We know from past experience that as the Lord continues to bring His people together in harmony, the Evil One continues to prowl about as a lion seeking to devour any susceptible to his wiles.

This month’s lead article by J.K. McKee has been entitled, “Purim, Haman, and Anti-Semitism.” As he continues to expand the Messianic Apologetics division of Outreach Israel, there is also a change in our service narrative that will begin to come into focus. In the past, our ministry has tended to almost exclusively be focused on helping non-Jewish families and individuals, like ours, get acclimated to the Messianic movement and experience, as they embrace their faith heritage in Israel’s Scriptures. Because of our growing associations with Messianic Jewish Believers and leaders over the past few years, we will be focusing more efforts on how we can make a substantial contribution to Jewish outreach and evangelism, particularly in the apologetics of Yeshua’s Messiahship and Bible difficulties. This is very exciting! Please continue to support our efforts with your financial contributions! Without your offerings and gifts, it would be difficult to dedicate the time and energy to produce our many educational resources.

Thank you in advance for your partnership with our ministry endeavors!

“The LORD bless you, and keep you; the LORD make His face shine on you, and be gracious to you; the LORD lift up His countenance on you, and give you peace” (Numbers 6:24-26).

Shalom and blessings,

Mark Huey


Purim, Haman, and Anti-Semitism

by J.K. McKee
editor@messianicapologetics.net

This month the worldwide Jewish community will be commemorating the Festival of Lots or Purim. As many of us know, Purim is a time when the account of the Book of Esther is read, there is typically some kind of congregational play where young people dress up as Biblical characters, and there is a great deal of food. Purim is a calendrical reminder that one month later, we will be remembering the Passover. There are many important themes of Purim, as witnessed in the Book of Esther, which force us as God’s people to not only consider the ancient Jewish exile from the Promised Land, but also how anti-Semitism and anti-Judaism is a blight that humanity has been suffering from for well over two millennia.

I have already written many things about Purim and the Book of Esther, which are included in our ministry’s Messianic Spring Holiday Helper publication, as well as in A Survey of the Tanach for the Practical Messianic. As someone who has been involved in Biblical Studies, my approach to reading the Book of Esther is not guided by me trying to look for esoteric or hidden meanings behind the characters of Queen Esther, King Ahasuerus (Xerxes), Mordecai, or Haman. While there are points of irony within the account of Esther, and one can surely see the sovereign direction of the God of Israel behind the events—my interest is understandably more focused on the historicity of the events, and how we learn from them moving forward in time. There certainly was an Ancient Persian Empire that controlled what we today call the Middle East, and into parts of both India and the Eastern Mediterranean. There certainly was a large displaced population of Jews, living in exile away from their home in the Land of Israel.

At the end of 2003, I can recall some of the unexpected reactions that many people in the Messianic community had, when The Jewish Study Bible by Oxford University Press was released. Even today, the engagement level that many Messianic people have tends to begin and end with the resources produced by Orthodox Jewish publishers such as ArtScroll—which definitely sits at the (far) Right end of the spectrum. When The Jewish Study Bible was released, it was acclaimed to be a compendium of Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform Jewish scholarship; what it ended up being was a Jewish edition of another Oxford Annotated Bible, meaning that it was very liberal. Its introduction for the Book of Esther approached Esther as though the story were ahistorical at best, but in all likelihood an ancient novella akin to modern day soap operas, broadly fiction, with its inclusion in the Hebrew canon of the Tanach to be somewhat spurious. I certainly believe that the Book of Esther contains reliable history, and should not be removed from the Biblical canon—but historical issues in the Book of Esther are actually some of the least of our challenges when approaching the Tanach.

I seriously wonder if some of the conclusions drawn by those who treat the Book of Esther as being ahistorical, are affected by how Purim can often be commemorated today in various settings. None of us should have any real problems with having a good time, and even putting on a dramatic presentation, in costume, of various Biblical stories. Dramatic presentations will necessarily invite embellishing a few things here or there. Ultimately though, the account of Esther chosen to be the wife of King Ahasuerus, Mordecai’s position in the Persian court, Haman’s manipulations—and God working behind the scenes through people strategically positioned—is something very serious and sober. There is no denying the fact that the account of the Book of Esther, forces each of us to consider the dastardly effects of anti-Semitism throughout world history. There has been a concentrated effort by the enemy to see that the Jewish people are eradicated—mainly because without the Jews, you have no people who can bear forth to God’s faithfulness of a Messiah to come.

When I was living in Central Florida from 2001-2012, my local Messianic congregation did have a customary Purim play, where the younger people, and a few of the adults, dressed up as characters from the Book of Esther. Periodically, however, the traditional play would be supplemented with another presentation: Hamans throughout history. In the traditional Purim play, the figure of the evil Haman is typically booed. Haman dresses up in all black, with some kind of an elaborate headpiece, and he is played by someone who has to give him sinister characteristics. And yes, for the record, I have played Haman on multiple occasions. Even though at the end of the record of Esther, Haman is put to death using the same mechanisms with which he sought to exterminate the Jews—anyone who reads history, is quite consciously aware of how anti-Semitism and anti-Judaism did not die with Haman. What many would rightly classify as “the spirit of Haman,” a chief demonic principality which seeks for the annihilation of the Jewish people, has been passed down among many willing vessels to our present day.

So, assuming that in attending a Shabbat service during the week of Purim, and witnessing the younger people and a few adults seemingly make fun of themselves as they go through the story of Esther—is the story of Esther to just be something where we have a good laugh, and then eat 250-calorie Hamentashen cookies afterwards? I am hardly someone who is against having a good time, but as I recall from the Hamans throughout history presentation, the customary Purim play only gives one-half of the story. How do we move forward with it?

When we contemplate the figure of Haman in the Persian court, we see the ultimate opportunist. Haman uses his subordinates to help elevate himself, and he manipulates the Persian king to acquire more and more power. One wonders if Haman ever saw himself deposing King Ahasuerus to become king himself, but what was more likely is that Haman was positioning himself to be the major power behind the throne, with Ahasuerus a puppet to do his bidding. Haman is stated to be a descendant of Agag (Esther 3:1), who was spared by King Saul (1 Kings 15:8), which can provide for some interesting speculation. But, Haman is ultimately someone intimately involved in the high political affairs of the Persian Empire. And, Haman is someone who found the Jew Mordecai to be a significant threat to him (Esther 3:2). Rather than simply seeking revenge on Mordecai for not showing him the respect he believed he was due, Haman seeks to eliminate all of the Jews in the Persian Empire (Esther 3:6).

The customary Purim play usually ends with two young people dressed as Persian soldiers, marching out a much larger adult, who will be hanged on his own gallows. When I played Haman years ago, I was marched out to the back of the congregation—where I then joined six others, as the second presentation was getting ready. Our congregational leader made a few observations about the fun and humor everyone was able to participate in, but that there was more to be heard. That the spirit of Haman lives on, in not just many people—but specific people in positions of great power in history—has to be recognized. And so, he invited the “Hamans throughout history” to come up and be introduced, with their various profiles as evidence of the great scourge of anti-Semitism and anti-Judaism.

While “Hamans throughout history” was supposed to be a very serious and probing presentation, it too embellished things. As I was obviously the first to walk out in front of the congregation, I recall back in 2004 how The Imperial March from Star Wars was specifically chosen to be played. Everyone had just “met” the Persian Haman in the preceding Purim play, but there was a recounting of who Haman was, his hatred for Mordecai and the Jewish people, and how he met his fate. And then, six others in costume were announced, one by one, to come up to the congregation and be introduced.

The next person who was announced to the congregation was a Greek, but more specifically someone who represented the Seleucids who invaded the Land of Israel, and sacrificed pigs at the Temple in Jerusalem. Because Chanukah had taken place only months before, the account of the Maccabean resistance was fresh on everyone’s minds. The Seleucid Greeks wanted the Jewish people to give up on the Torah, circumcision, the Sabbath, kosher dietary laws, and be assimilated into Greek culture and religion. Those who did not comply were put to death. While not the blanket extermination intended by the Persian Haman, the insidious nature of Antiochus Epiphanes, and in wanting to see the Jewish people annihilated by assimilation into the wider Hellenistic milieu, was well taken. Even today, the biggest threat to the survival of the Jewish people is not necessarily Middle Eastern terrorism, but instead is in Jews wanting to give up on their heritage, and completely assimilate into wider Gentile society.

The third person announced was a Roman, but someone who specifically was in costume as a Roman emperor. While Judea was a province of the Roman Empire, and Judaism was a legal and protected religion exempt from Caesar worship, on the whole the Jewish population within the Roman Empire tended to be a tolerated minority at best, but frequently discriminated against. The temptation to assimilate into paganism was always present, which led to Jewish zealots and others wanting to see the national integrity of the Jewish people preserved, by political independence. As readers of the Apostolic Scriptures are innately aware, as the good news of Yeshua was spreading out in the First Century, the tensions which led to the Jewish revolt and the fall of Jerusalem in 70 C.E. to Rome, were also building. The relationship between not only the Jewish people and the Romans—but the Believers in Israel’s Messiah—substantially deteriorated in the centuries following.

The fourth person introduced to the congregation was a Roman Catholic inquisitor. The common Jewish hostility to Roman Catholicism is very palpable. In the case of the Spanish Inquisition, its major purpose was to identify and convert those it considered to be heretics, so that the Kingdom of Spain could be a fully Catholic society. In the Sixteenth Century, this mainly included those of the nascent Protestant movement, which rejected Rome and papal authority—and the longstanding Jewish population, which had once flourished and thrived in Spain. The figure of the inquisitor invokes not only forced conversions of Jews to Roman Catholicism, but also the forced renunciation of various converts’ Jewish heritage via the compulsion to eat pork. But most especially, the figure of the inquisitor represents how there were Jewish people tortured to death by those claiming to represent the Messiah of Israel.

The fifth person introduced before the congregation was dressed up as Adolf Hitler. While the anti-Semitism of the Greek, the Roman, and the Inquisitor was less specific, the anti-Semitism of Nazi Germany was self-explanatory. A number of the factors leading to the rise of Hitler, including the anti-Semitism of German Reformer Martin Luther, and how the German Jews deeply integrated into German society were utterly betrayed by their Christian neighbors, were explained. More than anything else, the systematic extermination of the Jews of Europe, enacted by the most advanced society on Earth at the time—in terms of its science, technology, and philosophy—was graphically portrayed on the screen. The Holocaust and 6 million Jewish dead, to be sure, was the great tragedy of the Twentieth Century. But the Holocaust was perpetrated not just by some sadistic fascist state; it was perpetrated by those with all of the advancements and education of the age, and absolutely no ethics or humanity. And to be sure, the Holocaust was committed by many people claiming to be followers of Israel’s Messiah.

The sixth person introduced before the congregation was a Muslim terrorist. Since the founding of the State of Israel in 1948, modern Israel has not at all had an easy relationship with the surrounding Muslim countries. When I first started being involved with Hamans throughout history in 2004-2005, someone dressed up as Yassir Arafat came up, with a brief discussion and slides presented on the PLO and Intifada. After 2005, someone dressed up as Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the former president of Iran (2005-2013), came up—carrying a briefcase labeled as “Bomb,” with a radiation symbol on it no less! In this case, the point made was not only that the State of Israel had Muslim neighbors wishing its destruction, but at least one in Iran actively out to build a nuclear weapon. And to further intensify the point, President Ahmadinejad is technically a Persian. But, not only is Islamic terrorism and anti-Zionism a threat to Israel and the Jewish people, it is a threat to the Western world.

At this point in the Hamans throughout history, it can be legitimately interjected as to who else in past human affairs could have been brought before the audience. Seeing how my congregational leader, David Pavlik, had a huge walrus moustache, I actually thought about him dressing up as either Joseph Stalin or Saddam Hussein! You could probably have had a white supremacist or KKK member, or going back even before Haman, have had various Egyptians who oppressed Ancient Israel. But, being pressed for time, only one more person filled with “the spirit of Haman” could come before the audience: “He will speak out against the Most High and wear down the saints of the Highest One, and he will intend to make alterations in times and in law; and they will be given into his hand for a time, times, and half a time” (Daniel 7:25).

Not too unlike the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the seventh figure is presented before the congregation. The music is changed to be far more eerie and bone chilling. The final Haman is dressed in all-black suit, and wears a hockey mask, obscuring his face. The specific identity of this final person is unknown, but he has been foretold in the Holy Scriptures. The final figure who is brought before the congregation, is none other than he “who opposes and exalts himself above every so-called god or object of worship, so that he takes his seat in the temple of God, displaying himself as being God” (2 Thessalonians 2:4). The final Haman, the ultimate enemy of the Jewish people and the God of Israel, will be the antimessiah or antichrist. The challenge is put before the Messianic congregation to not just be able to identify and resist this person when he comes on the scene—but to now do everything humanly possible to increase one’s loyalty to the God of Israel, and support the Jewish people. For, as the antimessiah comes on the scene, so will there be a massive influx of Jewish people to the community of faith (cf. Romans 11:25-26ff)!

After moving back to North Texas in 2012, I do not know if the Hamans throughout history presentation is still conducted in my previous Messianic assembly. My current congregation, like many other Messianic Jewish congregations, to be sure, holds a Purim play for our Shabbat morning service. The sure advantage, of at least sitting down and recognizing that there has been a demonic principality operative throughout many centuries since the deliverance of the Jewish people during the time of Esther and Mordecai—opposing the God of Israel, His ways, and seeking the eradication of Jews—should cause us to consider our role as Messianic people for the future. The story of Esther does not end with the hanging of Haman. It might be said that the story of Esther will only end when “the beast was seized, and with him the false prophet who performed the signs in his presence, by which he deceived those who had received the mark of the beast and those who worshiped his image; these two were thrown alive into the lake of fire which burns with brimstone” (Revelation 19:20).

Anti-Semitism and anti-Judaism have been around for a very, very long time. Anti-Semitism was around centuries before the arrival of Yeshua the Messiah. All of us need to be aware of the blatant forces of anti-Semitism, found in the Hitlers, Arafats, and Ahmadinejads of the world. All of us need to stand in support of our local Jewish communities, and find ourselves as eager Zionists in friendship with the State of Israel. But what about the more subtle forms of anti-Semitism that can be encountered? While we know that many evangelical Christians today have a grossly under-whelming knowledge and appreciation for their Jewish Roots in the Synagogue—are you aware that many who consider themselves to be “Hebrew Roots” Believers do not have that much more knowledge or appreciation of Judaism?

One of the more obvious things that we have to encourage people to do, is read the Scriptures more intelligibly. Consider these two different versions of 1 Thessalonians 2:14-15, from two widely accessible Christian Bible versions:

“For you, brethren, became imitators of the churches of God in Christ Jesus that are in Judea, for you also endured the same sufferings at the hands of your own countrymen, even as they did from the Jews, who both killed the Lord Jesus and the prophets, and drove us out. They are not pleasing to God, but hostile to all men” (NASU).

“For you, brothers, became imitators of God’s churches in Christ Jesus that are in Judea, since you have also suffered the same things from people of your own country, just as they did from the Jews who killed both the Lord Jesus and the prophets and persecuted us; they displease God and are hostile to everyone” (HCSB).

The big difference here, in English reading, is whether or not a non-restrictive comma should be placed between vs. 14 and 15: “the Jews, who both killed the Lord Jesus” or “the Jews who killed the Lord Jesus.” Anyone who reads the Gospels in context, knows that it was only certain Jews, in the religious and political leadership, who were responsible for the death of Yeshua. Likewise, Paul himself further says in 1 Corinthians 2:8, “the rulers of this age…crucified the Lord of glory,” as the Romans also bore specific responsibility for executing the Messiah. In 1 Thessalonians 2:14-15, Paul is associating the Jewish religious leaders who were responsible for Yeshua’s death, with the Jewish religious leaders in Thessalonica, who saw him and his party ejected from the city (Acts 17:1-15). A smart reader can recognize this sort of detail, as there were thousands of Jews living in the Land of Israel, and certainly in the greater Diaspora, who had never  even heard of Yeshua of Nazareth and cannot be held at specific fault for seeing Him unjustly condemned to death. But an ignorant person from the Middle Ages would have used 1 Thessalonians 2:14-15 as a means to hunt down and persecute European Jews, blaming all Jews everywhere and at all times for the unjust trial and execution of Yeshua. Do not be surprised if the latter approach experiences some revival in the days ahead.

This month, an even more perditious form of anti-Semitism will manifest itself across many sectors of the independent Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement, largely composed of non-Jews—who while having embraced their faith heritage in the Tanach Scriptures, tend to be very suspicious, and at times hostile, to the Jewish Synagogue. To be fair, a number of the Hebrew Roots associations you will encounter embrace the Festival of Purim, and do their best to stand against anti-Semitism and anti-Judaism. They rightly believe that there are many lessons to be learned from the Book of Esther, they value the traditions and customs of Purim, and they are supportive of Zionism and the State of Israel. But many other people in the Hebrew Roots movement do not support Purim. In fact, they believe that Mordecai’s establishment of Purim as a holiday to be commemorated by the Jewish people, who were saved from extermination (Esther 9:20-22), is to be construed as “adding” to God’s Instruction in the Torah, and that Purim is to be rejected. I have even seen a few claim, just like many liberal theologians, that the Book of Esther is ahistorical and should not be canon.

If I want to see anything change this year, I want to see our appreciation for the themes of Purim deepen and increase. I do not want it to begin and end with a child’s play; I want to see more congregations having presentations on Hamans throughout history. I want the themes of God’s deliverance behind the scenes through good people, and the vigilance we all must maintain against anti-Semitism and anti-Judaism, be carried throughout the year.

February 2017 Outreach Israel News


OIM Update

February 2017

As noted in last month’s update, the change in direction of the government of the United States was a Godsend of magnanimous proportions! In many regards it could have been, according to a variety of righteous servants of the Most High, a direct result of God’s children crying out for mercy, and then protection, for the inauguration of the new executive administration. Whatever it was, for those old enough to bear witness to the persistent political pendulum swings of the American culture, there is one undeniable conclusion: the population of this 240-year old democratic republic is substantially divided about how to proceed into the future. To observe the internecine battles played out daily on various media outlets can be extremely disconcerting. There almost appears to be a self-destructive nature at work to tear apart people with different worldviews. We must persist in our prayers!

From a Biblical viewpoint, one knows that without the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit impacting a person’s thinking and understanding, diametrically opposed perspectives are expected. How, one might ask, is it possible for a person without faith under the domineering influence of the world, the flesh, and the Evil One (Ephesians 6:12; 1 John 2:16), going to comprehend spiritually appraised data in lieu of the onslaught of contradictory information? The Apostle Paul summarized the dilemma two millennia ago when writing to the Corinthians:

“Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, so that we may know the things freely given to us by God, which things we also speak, not in words taught by human wisdom, but in those taught by the Spirit, combining spiritual thoughts with spiritual words. But a natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; and he cannot understand them, because they are spiritually appraised. But he who is spiritual appraises all things, yet he himself is appraised by no one. For WHO HAS KNOWN THE MIND OF THE LORD, THAT HE WILL INSTRUCT HIM [Isaiah 40:13]? But we have the mind of Messiah” (1 Corinthians 2:12-16).

As I contemplated these realities, some words shared by Yeshua came to mind:

“If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand. If a house is divided against itself, that house will not be able to stand” (Mark 3:24-25; also Matthew 12:25; Luke 11:17).

Here in precise terms Yeshua stated that when a kingdom or a house is divided, it will not be able to stand. This universal truth applies to countries that the Almighty has always used for His sovereign purposes. Hence, the United States of America, founded on Judeo-Christian principles—and currently the foremost protector of the State of Israel—cannot avoid the severe negative consequences of division indefinitely. This is especially true in light of geopolitical circumstances which have the potential to erupt with nominal warning. Once again, we urge the faithful to pray for those in authority, as was declared recently from the inaugural podium, when this Scripture was read without any hesitation:

“First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings, be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority, so that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and dignity. This is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and one mediator also between God and men, the man Messiah Yeshua, who gave Himself as a ransom for all, the testimony given at the proper time” (1 Timothy 2:1-6).

With those Scriptures as a backdrop, rather than dwell on the depressing and surly aspects of division and vile detestation for others, instead I want to share a personal testimony which has taken place over the past year. This month’s lead article entitled, “One New Man Testimony: United We Stand,” describes how the Holy One of Israel is meeting the needs of people through willing vessels who are simply making themselves available to serve Him. Hopefully, everyone who reads this account will be as blessed, just as the author was, who simply followed the Spirit’s lead to help those in need.

Finally, our year has gotten off to a fast start and we are anticipating an acceleration of references to Israel as significant anniversaries occur later in the year! We know from past experience that as the Lord continues to bring His people together in harmony, the Enemy of our souls continues to prowl about as a lion seeking to devour any susceptible to his wiles. Hence, J.K. McKee continues to expand the Messianic Apologetics division of Outreach Israel in order to help people within the emerging Messianic community of faith refine their understanding. Please continue to support our efforts with your financial contributions. Without your offerings and gifts, it would be difficult to dedicate the time and energy to produce our many educational resources. Thank you in advance for your partnership with our endeavors!

With that in mind, may: “The LORD bless you, and keep you; the LORD make His face shine on you, and be gracious to you; the LORD lift up His countenance on you, and give you peace” (Numbers 6:24-26).

Shalom and blessings,

Mark Huey


One New Man Testimony: United We Stand

by Mark Huey
mark@outreachisrael.net

“Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brothers to dwell together in unity!”
Psalm 133:1

Who would have thought that Psalm 133:1 would be quoted in the inaugural address by the newly elected President of the United States of America? In a prophetic sort of way, it is our prayer that his—and our—desire for unity between people of relatively common faith, will be a hallmark of the new administration and the citizens of our divided nation over the next four to eight years. However, as people of faith witness over and again, the attainment of blessed unity, or even respectful coexistence, is under constant attack from nefarious spiritual forces that derive satisfaction from division, destruction, and the ultimate divider, death.

Lamentably, the acrimonious debate devolving to vile actions is never pleasant to observe. In fact, the constant reminder of negative disinformation can be discouraging and downright depressing! Hence, instead of writing and focusing on the ugly things people say and do to one another, I would like to, instead, share a positive personal testimony about how people from distinctly different Jewish and Christian backgrounds have come together to help others in desperate need. After all, everyone who fervently seeks to follow the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and walk in His ways, is exhorted to perform good works to and for their fellow human beings. Providentially, in a unique display of unity under the broad umbrella of the Holy Scriptures, there are Jewish Israelis, American Baptists, and Messianic Jews collaborating to minister to Syrian Christians fleeing from atrocious acts of carnage at this very hour. From my limited perspective as I watched the events unfold, it surely could have been God’s mercy answering the prayers of His people for those in significant need of medical attention.

In this particular case, although it continues to be a work in progress as of this writing, we find a prime modern-day example of a “one new man” collaboration of Jewish and non-Jewish people working together to help those in physical need. The spiritual ramifications of the relationships established remains to be seen, as hearts are softened on all sides of the Judeo-Christian spectrum. After all, over the last several decades since the reconstitution of the State of Israel in the Promised Land, the Holy One has been patiently and methodically removing the enmity and breaking down many of the historical barriers that have been built between the Jewish people and non-Jewish followers of Israel’s Messiah over the last two millennia. The Apostle Paul wrote some dynamic words to ancient Believers in the First Century, specifically on how Yeshua’s work has torn down the barrier wall of enmity, and how Jewish Believers and non-Jewish Believers in Israel’s Messiah were to be unified into a “one new man” or “one new humanity” in Him:

“For we are His workmanship, created in Messiah Yeshua for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we would walk in them. Therefore remember, that once you, the nations in the flesh—who are called ‘Foreskin’ by the ones called ‘Circumcision,’ which is in the flesh, made by hands—remember that you were at that time separate from Messiah, alienated from the Commonwealth of Israel, and strangers from the covenants of the promise, having no hope and without God in the world. But now in Messiah Yeshua you who were once far off, have been brought near in the blood of Messiah. For He is our peace, who made both groups one, and broke down the middle wall of partition, having abolished in His flesh the enmity, the religious Law of commandments in dogmas, that He might create in Himself the two into one new humanity, so making peace, and might reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, having killed the enmity by it” (Ephesians 2:10-16, PME).

With this Scriptural reminder of not only how all Believers in Israel’s Messiah are a part of the Commonwealth of Israel—but most especially how they are to experience great unity in His Body—the following is my testimony of what the Holy Spirit is doing to bring His people into unity to accomplish His purposes.

The resulting good works ministering to God’s children in Syria began in an unusual way, with a chance encounter at the Baylor Hospital in Dallas, Texas. In late November 2015, I was attending to the needs of my father, who was receiving an MRI for his trigeminal neuralgia disorder at the hospital lab. My brother and I were in the corridor speaking with the neurologist, when down the hall on an electric cart came a middle aged man who recognized and then greeted my brother. Apparently, these two SMU graduates had reserved season ticket seats next to each other at the basketball arena. Other than the time they sat together during games, they had no other real relationship. To be polite, my brother introduced me to Bruce, and I noticed he had a nametag on that indicated he worked for the Baylor Hospital system. So I asked him what he did, and he said that he helped raise money for the Baylor, Scott & White Health Group, and then also worked on distributing used medical equipment to needy people around the world, spending much of his time at his office in a warehouse just a block away.

As it happened, I had just seen a presentation about the Messianic Jewish Alliance of America’s, or MJAA’s, Joseph Project, a few weeks earlier. So, when Bruce mentioned medical equipment and giving it away, I simply asked him if they would consider giving some to needy people in Israel. Without hesitation, Bruce simply replied, “We give it to any needy people. All you have to do is pick it up and pay for the shipping overseas!” With that I said, “OK. When can I come by the warehouse and see what you have? Maybe some of this can minister to folks in Israel?” And from that providential point forward, a relationship was initiated that resulted in the shipment of a container of medical equipment and supplies in July 2016. In fact, I was able to solicit the medical expertise of one of our congregation members, an oncologist who had just recently retired from working at the Baylor Hospital. She was able to point out valuable medical equipment and supplies which would be appropriate to send, and was even going to be in Israel when the container was going to arrive. But the testimony does not end here…

The MJAA Joseph Project was already responsible for distributing over $100 million in humanitarian aid to Israeli Jews, Arabs, and even Palestinians (widows, orphans, homeless, elderly, disabled, and Holocaust survivors) over the past two decades. They were delighted to receive the generous gift of medical equipment and supplies from the Christian Baptists and their Faith in Action Initiative (FIAI), the non-profit organization of Baylor, Scott, & White Health Group. The FIAI is the entity that runs the warehouse and prepared the pallets of supplies and equipment for shipment. So in a unique sort of way, there was a collaborative “one new man” effort of Messianic Jews and Christians working together with the sole goal and desire to minister to people in Israel with this medical equipment and supplies. But there is more evidence of God’s handiwork.

After the container landed at the dock in Israel, because there were some used electric powered incubators, monitors, and sophisticated baby warmers, the Israeli Health Ministry would not let it into use because of government regulations about restrictions on “used” electrical medical equipment. This “red tape” hang up precipitated a series of meetings with not only some of the Orthodox Jewish Israeli Health Ministry bureaucrats, but also the Israeli Minister of Health, who is also Orthodox. Thankfully, the Joseph Project director, who coordinated the shipment, and our retired oncologist friend, were able to attend the meetings with the Health Minister this September 2016 in Israel. Their conversations went extremely well. The result was the Israeli Health Ministry actually changing some governmental policies to allow used medical equipment to come into Israel, and actually be given to smaller towns, villages, and settlements where they do not necessarily have the monetary resources to purchase new equipment. That breakthrough was quite a blessing, because what is happening in Israel through the efforts of the Joseph Project is spiritually significant! Orthodox and secular Jews are witnessing the tangible actions of Messianic Jews literally giving all sorts clothes, shoes, furniture, appliances, diapers, baby formula, and other things to needy people—without expecting anything in return. The unconditional love of the Messianic Jewish community, to those in need, is softening the hearts of many Jews, who have historically been antagonistic toward Yeshua the Messiah, and very distrusting and suspicious of the Messianic Jewish community. Clearly, God has been using the Joseph Project for His eternal purposes beyond just physical relief!

However, even though at the time all the parties to the breakthrough were elated, there was still a problem getting the new regulations written and approved through the Israeli Health Ministry. (Does this sound familiar to those working through other governmental entities?) But God had another plan. Instead, while the container remained on the dock and the stowage fees began to mount daily, word got out through the community of Messianics and an Israeli lobbyist, with many contacts with the Knesset and Israeli Defense Forces (IDF), that the container was being held up at the dock. Then somehow through a series of relationships, the person who started Israeli Flying Aid (IFA), a first responder to natural disasters, found out about the container of medical equipment. Through her contacts with the IDF, she was able to get the container released from the dock, and get the mounting stowage fees waived. She was then allowed to have the medical equipment and supplies sent clandestinely across the Israeli and Syrian border to help the Syrian “internally displaced people” (IDP) or refugees unable to leave the country. It is our understanding that many of these IDPs are Christian Syrians fleeing from the violence and carnage taking place in cities like Aleppo. Since the refugee camps established in Jordan are completely full and unwilling to take any more people, the Syrian IDPs are actually being collected down near the Golan Heights. How amazing is it that the IFA, performing some “good works” for their neighbors, have been instrumental in making all of this happen by the end of 2016? But if you can believe it, positive things continue to materialize.

In January 2017, after the people at the Joseph Project had developed this strong relationship with the secular Jewish Israelis and American Jews supporting the efforts of the Israeli Flying Aid missions, and the ongoing association with the Faith in Action Initiatives, a request for more aid was made to help those in Syria. Without any hesitation, the request for a container of medical equipment to be shipped in January was granted. In fact, during a long distance phone call showing the equipment available via Facetime technology, a request for a second container was suggested. Providentially on that very day, 87 pallets of shoes and orthopedic braces and boots had just arrived. Those at the FIAI warehouse were more than delighted to send a second container, because their own warehouse was too overloaded, with more medical equipment and supplies than it could handle. So not only did the MJAA Joseph Project send two containers which will make the trip to minister to the Christian Syrian IDPs, but a third container with 18 pallets of shoes will go directly to the Joseph Project warehouse in Israel this month. These will be distributed on a first come first served basis to needy Israelis of all backgrounds.

Quite frankly, I am marveling over how the Lord has orchestrated this rapid shipment of medical equipment and supplies to His needy people in Syria, and also in Israel. But what is also exciting to witness is how the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob is knitting together the hearts of Israeli Jews, Messianic Jews, and Christians, in order to minister to Syrian Christians, as well as Israelis who are both Jewish and Arab. God does not discriminate when it comes to answering the prayers of His people, and ministering to those in need.

As I contemplated and wrote this testimony, a variety of Scriptures came to mind. One in particular is found in the Sermon on the Mount, when Yeshua contrasts the command to love neighbor with the common human fault of hating one’s enemy:

“Give to him who asks of you, and do not turn away from him who wants to borrow from you. You have heard that it was said, ‘YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR [Leviticus 19:18] and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for He causes His sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? If you greet only your brothers, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? Therefore you are to be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect” (Matthew 5:42-48).

In addition, the Holy Scriptures are replete with commandments and examples of what is required to love God and your neighbor as yourself, as best summarized by the Messiah Yeshua, when questioned by a scribe as to what was the foremost commandment:

“One of the scribes came and heard them arguing, and recognizing that He had answered them well, asked Him, ‘What commandment is the foremost of all?’ Yeshua answered, ‘The foremost is, “HEAR, O ISRAEL! THE LORD OUR GOD IS ONE LORD; AND YOU SHALL LOVE THE LORED YOUR GOD WITH ALL YOUR HEART, AND WITH ALL YOUR SOUL, AND WITH ALL YOUR MIND, AND WITH ALL YOUR STRENGTH” [Deuteronomy 6:4-5]. The second is this, “YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AS YOURSELF” [Leviticus 19:18]. There is no other commandment greater than these.’ The scribe said to Him, ‘Right, Teacher; You have truly stated that He is one, and there is no one else besides Him [Deuteronomy 6:4]; AND TO LOVE HIM WITH ALL THE HEART AND WITH ALL THE UNDERSTANDING AND WITH ALL THE STRENGTH, AND TO LOVE ONE’S NEIGHBOR AS HIMSELF [Deuteronomy 6:5; Leviticus 19:18], is much more than all burnt offerings and sacrifices” (Mark 12:28-33).

Notice at the end of this passage that evidence of loving God and neighbor is much more beneficial than “all burnt offerings and sacrifices.” Is not ministering to the needs of neighbor—and perceived enemy—much more pleasing to our Creator than all the burnt offerings and sacrifices we can do? Now is that not something to think about as we move forward in 2017?! Perhaps we all should consider how we can live together in unity rather than in division. After all, we know how good and pleasant it can and will be if we can work toward that end!

So in this era of great division in our country, may our prayers be for those who persecute us—which quite frankly is a difficult thing to do. Nevertheless, we need to learn to love our neighbors and the immigrants which come to live among us, as was commanded of the Ancient Israelites in the Torah of Moses:

“When a stranger resides with you in your land, you shall not do him wrong. The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as the native among you, and you shall love him as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt; I am the LORD your God” (Leviticus 19:33-34).

The Lord God is testing all of us in this hour of rapid change, as the illegal immigrant population grows, not only in the United States, but in modern countries around the globe. And it is critical that we all understand that this axiom continues to ring true: “United we stand, divided we fall!”

I thank God that He is bringing together the “one new man” at His pleasure and according to His will. It is my prayer that this is one testimony which reflects His work among those who call upon the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and encourages one and all to continue to advance His Kingdom, until the Messianic restoration of all things…

January 2017 Outreach Israel News


OIM Update

January 2017

The arrival of the New Year brings with it cautious anticipation and optimistic expectations, tempered by the Biblical reality that The mind of man plans his way, but the LORD directs his steps” (Proverbs 16:9). In other words, despite the relative joy which many American followers of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob are experiencing due to a dramatic providential change in governmental leadership—as the political pendulum appears to have shifted from liberal to conservative—we are all still at the mercy of God’s sovereign will for His created order. Lest people from all nations of the world forget, Psalm 2 succinctly summarizes how the Holy One of Israel views the often inane machinations of humanity. Here in unequivocal terms, regardless of recent resolutions declared by the United Nations Security Council that impact the State of Israel and Zion as the apple of God’s eye (Zechariah 2:8), everyone on the planet is ultimately accountable to the words of Messiah Yeshua (Deuteronomy 18:15; Hebrews 12:25), the recognized Son of God:

“Why are the nations in an uproar and the peoples devising a vain thing? The kings of the earth take their stand and the rulers take counsel together against the LORD and against His Anointed, saying, ‘Let us tear their fetters apart and cast away their cords from us!’ He who sits in the heavens laughs, the Lord scoffs at them. Then He will speak to them in His anger and terrify them in His fury, saying, ‘But as for Me, I have installed My King upon Zion, My holy mountain.’ I will surely tell of the decree of the LORD: He said to Me, ‘You are My Son, today I have begotten You. Ask of Me, and I will surely give the nations as Your inheritance, and the very ends of the earth as Your possession. You shall break them with a rod of iron, You shall shatter them like earthenware.’ Now therefore, O kings, show discernment; take warning, O judges of the earth. Worship the LORD with reverence and rejoice with trembling. Do homage to the Son, that He not become angry, and you perish in the way, for His wrath may soon be kindled. How blessed are all who take refuge in Him!” (Psalm 2:1-12).

Thankfully by God’s merciful grace, many in the world today have freely received the offer of salvation by faith in the accomplished sacrificial work of the Messiah, and in so doing, not only worship Him, but are blessed to take refuge in Him. It is our fervent prayer that the timely respite from tumbling into the abyss of ungodly liberalism and secular humanism, will be used by the Holy Spirit to bring countless others around the globe to a salvific knowledge of Yeshua’s unconditional love for them.

As a result, in what we might term a “line extension” in time, prior to the eventual return of Yeshua the Messiah to rule and reign from Jerusalem—work to advance God’s Kingdom on Earth continues, with the spiritual impediments that the Holy One has sovereignly allowed. In light of the oracles of God which have been entrusted to and preserved by the Jewish people down through the millennia (Romans 3:2), humanity today has at the very least a vague roadmap for how the Almighty plans to exercise His will among the nations. With that in mind, this month’s lead article entitled, “2017: A Pivotal Year Ahead,” is an attempt to recognize that the Eternal One is a God of peace and not confusion (1 Corinthians 14:33), who at times allows His followers to obliquely through a mirror dimly (1 Corinthians 13:12), see His hands upon the levers of historical events. Personally, I believe this peek is for a “time such as this,” so that the encouragement received from prayers answered will elicit even greater prayers, and hopefully concrete actions in the days, weeks, months, and years to come before the Messiah’s ultimate return.

There is a huge volume of work to be undertaken, in order to complete God’s commission to every Believer to share the good news, and make disciples of those from every tongue, tribe, and nation. We must each individually ask the Creator God: What did You create me for? How do You want me to accomplish Your purposes on Earth during my lifetime?

For us at Outreach Israel Ministries and Messianic Apologetics, the answer has been consistent. Dedicate your lives to serving Me, by helping Messianic people understand My ways and how I am restoring all things as promised (Acts 3:19-21). Since 2002, our family has been intimately involved, in full time ministry, with the emerging and still-developing Messianic community of faith, as the Holy One has been working diligently to bring all of His people, Jewish and non-Jewish Believers, together as “one new man” or “one new humanity” (Ephesians 2:15). In particular, John McKee has been given significant intellect, spiritual maturity, and an incredible work ethic to produce articles, FAQ entries, books, commentaries, and audio and video podcasts for today’s Messianic people. I would encourage everyone to financially partnering with our efforts, as we certainly believe that the teachings we offer, will help today’s Messianic movement mature more rapidly.

With that in mind, may: “The LORD bless you, and keep you; the LORD make His face shine on you, and be gracious to you; the LORD lift up His countenance on you, and give you peace” (Numbers 6:24-26).

Have a personally peaceful and spiritually fruitful 2017!

Mark Huey


2017: A Pivotal Year Ahead

by Mark Huey
mark@outreachisrael.net

For the ardent student of the Bible, with an insatiable appetite to understand world history, and how humanity has traveled down through the annals of time, recent political events in the United States, coupled with geopolitical events around the globe, recognizably reflect God’s sovereign hand upon the affairs of mankind. Certainly many astute observers, who are Believers in the Holy One of Israel—with the distinct benefit of the Holy Spirit or the Comforter/Teacher/Helper resident in the heart—can filter through the overwhelming input of true and false information, in order to discern what the Father is revealing to His children:

“But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all that I said to you” (John 14:26).

During this time period through supplication and appeals to the Almighty One for His mercy, many in the faith community which calls upon the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob through the beneficence of the accomplished work of Yeshua the Messiah, were led to read and contemplate an overabundance of opinions easily obtainable by access to the Internet. Prophecy teachers expounded eloquent theories, and predictive “words” were given by various people who generally claimed that they were “hearing from God” or “had a vision” about certain things which were on the horizon. Certainly, I would have to admit that I was especially excited to read how various voices were discerning a Cyrus-anointing (Isaiah 45) upon one of the U.S. presidential candidates, and I even began to pray and encourage others to ask for a Jehu-anointing on that same candidate (2 Kings 9-10). Thankfully, there are indications that these unique attributes appear to be evident to the next leader of the free world, even before the designated power to execute justice has been bestowed. Hence, the Biblical admonition to pray for those in authority (Romans 13), or soon to be, needs to continue by the faithful:

“First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings, be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority, so that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and dignity. This is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth” (1 Timothy 2:2).

Nevertheless, from a Biblical perspective, the chosen of God down through the ages have always had challenges presented to them by nefarious forces seen and unseen. In fact, when one analyzes the recorded history of Israel in the Bible, there are distinct patterns recognizable by anniversaries which appear to affirm that the Lord is the Author and Perfecter of our faith (Hebrews 12:2).

One obvious reoccurrence has been the events that have taken place on the Ninth of Av, which most notably include the destruction of the First and Second Temples on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. But according to Jewish history, the Ninth of Av, and the horrific things associated with it, actually began centuries earlier (1313 B.C.E.), when the twelve spies returned from Canaan on the Eighth of Av. On the Ninth of Av, the ten faithless spies gave a bad report which discouraged the Israelites fleeing from Egypt, resulting in forty years of wandering in the desert. This was followed by the destruction of the First Temple (423 B.C.E.) and the Second Temple (69 C.E.). Additionally, the Battle of Betar, the final butchering of Jews from the rebellion of Bar Kochba in 133 C.E., was also on this day. Much later, the expulsion of Jews from England in 1290 and Spain in 1492 both occurred on the Ninth of Av. And finally, the day that Germany declared war on Russia to begin World War I was on the Ninth of Av, 1914. Surely, the patterns realized on the Ninth of Av have made this a day to live in infamy down through the centuries in Jewish history. With this notable example, God has used some providential patterns on the annual calendar to remind people that He is in charge of what actually occurs or what He allows among the created order.

However, in addition to actual days on the Hebrew calendar, the Eternal God of Creation has also set in motion other time markers which occur less frequently, that we may be reminded of how He is a God of order who uses time as a means to establish patterns of behavior. Obviously, the seven-day week is a pattern set in motion. When one researches the history of the seven-day week, there is attribution sought by various ancient cultures in antiquity. Yet, for those who believe in the authority of the Holy Scriptures, it is clear that the seven-day week reflects back upon the account of Creation found in Genesis chs. 1-2. Failed attempts by post-revolution France in the late 1700s and the Soviet Union in the 1930s, to alter the seven-day calendar, did not prevail—and for the most part, both Western Civilization and the commercial world in general, have embraced and utilize the seven-day work week. There is variance among cultures as to what day is considered the first day of the week, but for the most part, in order to maintain proper order and transactional accountability, the seven-day week has become almost universally accepted in the Twenty-First Century.

Of course, a natural extension of the seven-day week found in the Holy Scriptures are patterns adopted for seven days, and even seven years. Recall the seven years of plenty versus the seven years of famine found in Genesis 41, when Joseph correctly interpreted Pharaoh’s dreams. These critical events ultimately leading to the preservation of the children of Israel, foreshadowed the eventual codification of the Sabbatical year and the year of jubilee as recorded in Leviticus 25:

“The LORD then spoke to Moses at Mount Sinai, saying, ‘Speak to the sons of Israel and say to them, “When you come into the land which I shall give you, then the land shall have a sabbath to the LORD. Six years you shall sow your field, and six years you shall prune your vineyard and gather in its crop, but during the seventh year the land shall have a sabbath rest, a sabbath to the LORD; you shall not sow your field nor prune your vineyard. Your harvest’s aftergrowth you shall not reap, and your grapes of untrimmed vines you shall not gather; the land shall have a sabbatical year. All of you shall have the sabbath products of the land for food; yourself, and your male and female slaves, and your hired man and your foreign resident, those who live as aliens with you. Even your cattle and the animals that are in your land shall have all its crops to eat. You are also to count off seven sabbaths of years for yourself, seven times seven years, so that you have the time of the seven sabbaths of years, namely, forty-nine years. You shall then sound a ram’s horn abroad on the tenth day of the seventh month; on the day of atonement you shall sound a horn all through your land. You shall thus consecrate the fiftieth year and proclaim a release through the land to all its inhabitants. It shall be a jubilee for you, and each of you shall return to his own property, and each of you shall return to his family. You shall have the fiftieth year as a jubilee; you shall not sow, nor reap its aftergrowth, nor gather in from its untrimmed vines. For it is a jubilee; it shall be holy to you. You shall eat its crops out of the field. On this year of jubilee each of you shall return to his own property”’” (Leviticus 25:1-13).

In Ancient Israel there was a pattern established for the seven-year Sabbatical rest, a special time of release after seven sevens (forty nine) and then the year of jubilee on the fiftieth year. Today there is much contentious debate about what exactly are “years of jubilee.” At this point in world history, Jewish and Christian theologians and scholars are not in agreement on the timing of the years, or even whether it is applicable for our modern setting. Nevertheless, yearly patterns do occur—and regardless of whether the Jewish year 5777 which began last Fall is a “jubilee year”—2017 (and 2018) will have some very significant anniversaries, falling into fifty, seventy, and one hundred year patterns.

Personally, because modern man has become accustomed to following the news cycles promoted by the increasingly ubiquitous Internet and social media feeds, I expect considerable opinionated outlets to make the world aware of events which directly affect Israel. After all, Zion has always been the apple of God’s eye (Zechariah 2:8), and followers of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob know that the nations of the world will constantly be at odds with God’s chosen people and the plans He has for Israel. So let us examine some of the anniversaries which will be referenced in books, articles, governmental speeches, news media interviews, movies, and television in the coming months—which will keep Israel in the forefront of people’s minds. After all, the God of Creation has made certain absolute promises regarding the restoration of Israel to the Promised Land, that He must eventually fulfill.

Consider, for example, the recent U.N. Resolution 2334 of 23 December, 2016, where in a speech from the U.S. State Department, Secretary of State John Kerry referenced the upcoming 120 year anniversary of the August 1897 First Zionist Congress in Basel, Switzerland. There, after the Congress adjourned, Theodore Herzl (the recognized father of modern Israel) on September 3, 1897, prophetically wrote in his diary:

“In Basel I founded the Jewish State…If I said this aloud today, I would be answered by universal laughter. Perhaps in five years, and certainly in fifty, everyone will agree.”

Providentially, the nascent United Nations passed U.N. Resolution 181 on 29 November 1947 (almost fifty years to the day), which declared a partition of the region under the post-World War I British Mandate. The area which was known as “Palestine,” actually became the territory for the formation of the modern State of Israel.

However, it was Secretary Kerry’s reference to 120 years in his speech which caught my attention, primarily because of a verse spoken by God recorded after the Flood of Noah’s time:

“Then the LORD said, ‘My Spirit shall not strive with man forever, because he also is flesh; nevertheless his days shall be one hundred and twenty years’” (Genesis 6:3).

As I pondered all of the striving which has taken place over the past 120 years (since 1897) regarding the Promised Land and the restoration of the Jewish people to their ancestral home, some historical patterns came to mind which were monumental anniversaries in fifty, seventy, and one hundred (2 times 50) year increments.

In the year 1917, there were two circumstances which were incredibly instrumental in allowing the Jewish people to return to the Promised Land in increasing numbers. The first was a letter written on 2 November, 1917 by Lord Arthur James Balfour, the British Foreign Secretary, to Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild, a leader of the British Jewish community, for transmission to the Zionist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland. In a document that became known as the “Balfour Declaration,” it was forthrightly stated.

His Majesty’s government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.

In November 2017, people in Israel, the worldwide Jewish community, and friends of Israel all over the world—most especially Messiah followers who understand God’s promises to restore Israel to its historical land—will be recognizing the one-hundreth anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, and what it meant to the changing tides of history.

The second major event of 1917, for the restoration of Israel, occurred in December 1917, when General Edmund Allenby of the British Expeditionary Forces captured Jerusalem from the failing Ottoman Empire. For the first time in four hundred years, the ancient revered city of Jerusalem was no longer under the control of Arab, Muslim, or Turkish forces. Jews were allowed to return and live relatively peaceably in their ancient capital city. By 1922, the formal British Mandate was established by the League of Nations as a protectorate to maintain order in the region. The British Mandate of Palestine was the administrative authority of the region from 1920-1948, but this period of time between the World Wars also obviously witnessed European powers vying for political and military dominance. With the end of World War I in 1918, the demise of the Ottoman Empire, the defeat of the German Empire and Austro-Hungarian Empire, and the communist revolution in Russia, the British and the French were in the best position to maintain order in the Middle East.

However, it was not until after World War II and the Holocaust with the defeat of Nazi Germany and the Axis powers, when on 29 November 1947, the United Nations agreed to U.N. Resolution 181 which formally declared a Jewish state and Arab state, with Jerusalem declared a corpus separatum or international city. The seventieth anniversary of this resolution will be taking place in the Fall of 2017, along with the one-hundredth anniversary of the Balfour Declaration. Needless to say, the news cycles will be filled with stories about these critical events which have impacted the history of the modern Middle East. This is especially true as the enemies of Israel continue to try to delegitimize the State of Israel and its right to exist. The proposed two-state solution, which is most contrary to the Bible, has been promoted with a vicious attempt in recent years via the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions or BDS Movement against Israel—something not only proposed by various countries against Israel, but is seeing increasing support in various sectors of evangelical Christianity.

But 2017 will also see another anniversary which compliments the defeat of the Turks and capture of Jerusalem by the British in 1917. 2017 will be the fiftieth anniversary of the liberation of Jerusalem from the Jordanians following the Six Day War, on June 7, 1967. (Do you see a pattern? 1917-50 years to 1967-50 years to 2017. Are these potential jubilees? Or are they simply coincidences?) On that day, the Israeli Defense Forces overwhelmed the efforts of the armies of Syria, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, and Lebanon to defeat and destroy Israel. Instead, the God of Israel prevailed in miraculous ways, and the outmanned Israeli army had an incredible victory which sent their enemies back from the Golan Heights, across the Jordan River, the Gaza Strip, and even beyond the Suez Canal. The captured territories from this war established boundaries that were defensible. So, when the fiftieth anniversary of this implausible Israeli victory is recognized and celebrated, it will doubtlessly spark recriminations coming from the world at large, from those who want Israel to give back all of these lands. This, in fact, is what the recent U.N. Resolution 2334 has set in place for the coming year. Thankfully, we will have a new administration in government of the United States which has a completely different approach on how America should be handling its relationship with the State of Israel.

Please be mindful that these anniversaries, and all of the potential controversies that the nations and peoples of the world will generate to come against Israel—are merely a prelude to what will be taking place in May 2018 as the State of Israel celebrates its seventieth anniversary. Providentially, the one-hundreth anniversary of the conclusion of World War I will be remembered on November 11, 2018. Significant world events will be remembered simultaneously, with overlapping discussions in academia, among the intelligentsia, the media, in religious circles, and virtually everywhere with the omnipresent access of information to the mass of humanity.

I believe this will be an excellent time to be knowledgeable about these anniversaries and how they will impact Israel and the believing community at large, because I believe they reveal some aspect of the mysteries of God (Deuteronomy 29:29). Conversations will be plentiful by many who are searching for answers about what will be characterized as “controversial topics” which are harmful to global peace and security. As followers of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and Yeshua the Messiah—there will be ample opportunity to share the hope that is within us. The Apostle Paul put it this way:

“Of this [assembly] I was made a minister according to the stewardship from God bestowed on me for your benefit, so that I might fully carry out the preaching of the word of God, that is, the mystery which has been hidden from the past ages and generations, but has now been manifested to His saints, to whom God willed to make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles, which is Messiah in you, the hope of glory. We proclaim Him, admonishing every man and teaching every man with all wisdom, so that we may present every man complete in Messiah. For this purpose also I labor, striving according to His power, which mightily works within me” (Colossians 1:25-29).

It is my prayer that 2017 will be a very special year for each of us, as we enter into this season when the subject of God and Israel will be on many hearts. I urge you to be equipped, because I believe the parable of the fig tree or Israel’s restoration, applies to us, given the series of anniversaries getting ready to take place. If that is so, then Yeshua’s warnings to His generation are apropos for us today:

“‘But when these things begin to take place, straighten up and lift up your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.’ Then He told them a parable: ‘Behold the fig tree and all the trees; as soon as they put forth leaves, you see it and know for yourselves that summer is now near. So you also, when you see these things happening, recognize that the kingdom of God is near. Truly I say to you, this generation will not pass away until all things take place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will not pass away. Be on guard, so that your hearts will not be weighted down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of life, and that day will not come on you suddenly like a trap; for it will come upon all those who dwell on the face of all the earth. But keep on the alert at all times, praying that you may have strength to escape all these things that are about to take place, and to stand before the Son of Man’” (Luke 21:28-36).

2017 will be a pivotal year for those with hearts prepared to share the hope that is within them. May we all be so ready, as we ask the Holy One to use each of us to advance His Kingdom on Earth, until the Messianic restoration of all things…

December 2016 OIM News


OIM Update

December 2016

Now that the American electoral season has come to a conclusion, many (but not all) in the evangelical and Messianic community of faith have experienced a collective sigh of relief. Personally, as I indicated in last month’s article, our prayerful pleas and heartfelt supplications have shifted from seeking mercy for our national direction, to protecting those who have been elected to lead our nation. There is substantial encouragement from statements made by parties involved with the incoming administration, that the U.S. Executive Branch will have a strong relationship with the leadership of the State of Israel. This probability in and of itself brings great joy to our hearts, because we know from Biblical and historical evidence, that the Almighty favors individuals and nations which bless Abram/Abraham and his chosen descendants:

“Now the LORD said to Abram, ‘Go forth from your country, and from your relatives and from your father’s house, to the land which I will show you; and I will make you a great nation, and I will bless you, and make your name great; and so you shall be a blessing; and I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse. And in you all the families of the earth will be blessed’” (Genesis 12:1-3).

I have personally talked to people who have heard directly from reliable sources, and read some articles, indicating that the incoming President-elect is very favorable to relocating the American Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. While this potential move would validate the Jewish State and its right to exist in the Promised Land, it would in and of itself be extremely controversial among the powers which continually war against the children of Israel (Psalm 83). But thankfully, controversy is not something the new administration is unaccustomed to, but rather extremely adept at handling. As followers of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, who believe in the accomplished work of the Messiah Yeshua at Golgotha (Calvary), we need to redouble our prayers, with occasional Hallelujah pauses, as we literally witness prophecy unfold right before our eyes!

This month of December 2016 arrives at a very unique season for the growth and development of the Messianic community of faith. As anyone involved with Messianic things is astutely aware, December brings challenges to people, as they involve the holiday of Christmas on December 25, and the commemoration of the Feast of Dedication or Chanukah. Our ministry does have a book available, entitled the Messianic Winter Holiday Helper, which has been compiled to provide teaching, as well as sound advice, on how to handle some of the inevitable conversations which will arise during this time of year. We encourage you to get a copy for your personal use, or to give as a gift to help others.

Since relocating back to North Texas four years ago, we have seen our family and our ministry steadily welcomed not just into a local Messianic Jewish congregation, but this past November, John was a featured speaker as the MJAA Heartland regional conference. While we are entirely supportive and promoting of an inclusive and welcoming Messianic community, as Jew and non-Jew are brought together as “one new man” (Ephesians 2:15), there has been a noticeable gap building between Outreach Israel Ministries and Messianic Apologetics—and the mainly non-Jewish Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement. While we will interact with all sorts of individual people, who label themselves by many different things, there have been developments in the independent Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement in the past few years which we are very disturbed by.

The Lord is definitely doing something very important in this hour, as non-Jewish Believers are embracing their faith heritage in Israel’s Scriptures in a very profound and significant way. Our own family’s involvement in the Messianic movement since 1995 is a testimony to this. As it is very clearly foretold in Micah 4:1-3 and Isaiah 2:2-4, the nations will come to Zion in the Last Days to be taught God’s Torah. And, per the thrust of the Jeremiah 31:31-34 and Ezekiel 36:25-27 New Covenant, this is to be a work of the Holy Spirit for all of His people. But, the welcomed participation of the nations within the Commonwealth of Israel (Ephesians 2:11-13) or Israel of God (Galatians 6:16), is hardly supposed to take place to the exclusion of the salvation of the Jewish people. We are finding that more and more people in the independent Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement, are not too concerned with the issues of Jewish outreach, Jewish evangelism, and Israel solidarity. They are keen to embrace their Hebrew Roots in the Torah and Tanach, but not too interested in embracing their Jewish Roots in the Second Temple religion of Yeshua and His Apostles.

This month’s lead article, by J.K. McKee, notes how many non-Jewish Believers who have entered into the “broad Messianic movement,” are not going to be remembering the Feast of Dedication or Chanukah this month. These are people who have largely left the confines of their previous Christian church, and they even regard themselves as being grafted-in to Israel’s olive tree via their faith in Israel’s Messiah (Romans 11:16-17), but they have a very difficult time with understanding Judaism and the Jewish people. They may understand the Apostles’ question of Acts 1:6, “Lord, is it at this time You are restoring the kingdom to Israel?”, but only in part. While recognizing that there is more going on in the Messianic movement than just declaring the good news of Yeshua to Jewish people who need salvation, the article “A Restoration of Israel—Without the Jews?” is critical of some of the things presently being witnessed in the independent Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement. With many non-Jews claiming to have embraced their faith heritage in Israel’s Kingdom, it is amazing to see how many of them are not too concerned with issues of Jewish outreach. Dismissing Chanukah as a vain human tradition, among many possible examples, is not going to aid the first and primary mission of the Messianic movement: to see the Messiah’s Jewish brethren come to redemption.

Finally, it is the time when many of you are considering where to invest in God’s work through others with a variety of year-end giving opportunities. Consider the specific work and calling of Outreach Israel Ministries and Messianic Apologetics. Our family is uniquely positioned to not only address the theological and spiritual issues which face many of today’s Messianic people, but we are also working for resolution to some of the things which have divided or confused too many of us for too long. We are making able usage of all of the tools at our disposal, as we anticipate the Messianic restoration of all things!

“May the LORD bless you, and keep you; the LORD make His face shine on you, and be gracious to you; the LORD lift up His countenance on you, and give you peace” (Numbers 6:24-26).

Thank you in advance for your partnership with us and your generous support of our endeavors!

Chag Samaech!

Mark Huey


A Restoration of Israel–Without the Jews?

by J.K. McKee
editor@messianicapologetics.net

This month of December 2016, the Jewish and Messianic Jewish communities will be commemorating Chanukah or the Festival of Dedication. Chanukah is a very warm time for Jewish and Messianic Jewish families, mainly as they reflect back on different family memories, special times of fellowship, gift giving, and of course eating many specialty foods. In many Messianic congregations the world over, there will be dedicated times of reading from the Books of Maccabees, focusing on the ancient history of the Seleucid invasion of the Land of Israel, the resistance that opposed Hellenism and upheld God’s Torah, and which assured not just a Jewish victory over evil but the very survival of the Jewish people. For those of us in Biblical Studies, the Maccabean crisis of the Second Century B.C.E. significantly impacted the Second Temple Jewish world of Yeshua of Nazareth, and in particular the attitudes of many within the Jewish community to their Greek and Roman neighbors. Many of the conflicts in the First Century ekklēsia that took place, as Greeks and Romans began receiving the Messiah of Israel into their lives—and whether these people had to be circumcised as Jewish proselytes in order to truly be reckoned as God’s own—can trace their way back to the effects of what we review during the season of Chanukah.

Ten to eleven years ago (2005-2006), in my family’s Messianic quest, we fully embraced the remembrance of Chanukah. Up until this point, we had moved beyond Christmas on December 25, but were unsure of the Festival of Dedication. We certainly had no problem with joining in to various congregational activities which took place on Shabbat, in order to remember Chanukah, which mainly included various readings from 1&2 Maccabees and lighting the chanukiah. The significance of the Maccabean crisis really began to come into focus for us, as I started writing Messianic commentaries on various books of the New Testament, and found myself referencing not just the Maccabean revolt—but its psychological impact on later Jewish generations. Without the victory of the Maccabees over the Seleucid Greeks, there would be no Jewish people into which the Messiah of Israel would be born. Chanukah should be remembered by today’s Messianic community, no different than how Americans celebrate the Fourth of July.

Today, if you are a part of a Messianic Jewish congregation, some significant remembrance of Chanukah is going to take place, likely including various teachings which compare the Maccabees’ cleansing of the Temple to how we as Yeshua’s followers need to be cleansed by Him. If you are part of some informal Messianic home group or Torah study, you may also have some kind of Chanukah remembrance. But, if you are part of the widely independent Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement—something mainly, if not exclusively, composed of non-Jews—then you will see variances in approach to Chanukah. Many people who identify as being a part of the Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement, think that the Festival of Dedication is something spiritually edifying and worthwhile for God’s people to remember (cf. Philippians 4:8). Many others, however, would consider Chanukah to be a hollow Jewish custom that the Messiah’s followers should not be observing, and they think that when the Festival of Dedication is mentioned in John 10:22-23 that Yeshua was not commemorating it along with the rest of the Jewish community, but stood off to the side in disapproval.

As a Messianic Bible teacher, and not only as someone who has been a part of this movement since 1995—but who actively uses social media—I interact with people all across the spectrum, who identify with any number of different labels. While I am not always successful, I do try my best to be a consensus builder, being a firm believer that what the Messiah of Israel has accomplished for us, in being sacrificed for our sins, is the most important thing. If you are going to divide with someone, make sure that it is over something directly related to the Messiah’s work. In my over twenty-one years of being involved in Messianic things, I have certainly witnessed my share of controversies, and I am astutely aware of the competing spiritual forces which can manifest across our faith community.

What we call “the Messianic movement” today is something that has its origins deeply rooted within Protestant evangelistic outreaches to the Jewish community, first in Europe and Britain, and later in North America, starting in the early Nineteenth Century. The Hebrew Christian movement, of the late Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, was an association of Jewish Believers in Jesus, usually as a sub-sector of Protestantism, where various aspects of Torah could be observed as a part of Jewish culture, in parallel to conventional Protestant observances. The Messianic Jewish movement, which really entered onto the scene in the 1960s and 1970s, emphasized Jewish outreach and evangelism via congregations established on a synagogue model, and where various aspects of Torah—such as keeping Shabbat, the appointed times, or a kosher diet—were no longer just aspects of Jewish culture to be remembered, but were aspects of Jewish obedience to God via the expectations of the New Covenant (Jeremiah 31:31-34; Ezekiel 36:25-27). The primary mission of the Messianic movement has always had a basis in Jewish outreach, Jewish evangelism, and Israel solidarity. And this is the way it should be, as is declared so affluently in Romans 1:16: “For I am not ashamed of the Good News, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who trusts—to the Jew first and also to the Greek” (TLV).

Within the 1980s and 1990s, as the Messianic Jewish outreach widened, and new Messianic Jewish congregations and synagogues began being established—it is safe to say that something did take place, which was widely not anticipated by some of the early Messianic Jewish leaders. During this time, many evangelical Christians were being directed by the Lord to Messianic congregations, for a variety of reasons. The primary reason that non-Jewish Believers are drawn to Messianic congregations, is to remember the significance of Yeshua the Messiah in the appointed times. My own family was among those steadily drawn into their Jewish Roots throughout the 1908s, via studying “Jesus in the feasts.” Concurrent with this, many non-Jewish Believers drawn into Messianic congregations get quickly acclimated to the weekly study of the Torah portion, and in reconnecting with the Tanach or Old Testament in a very tangible way not witnessed in contemporary evangelicalism.

Today in 2016, if you asked many individual Messianic people, they would have to agree that there is a dual mission being achieved within the Messianic movement. First and foremost, the Messianic movement is here to see Jewish people come to saving faith in Israel’s Messiah, in fulfillment of prophecy (cf. Romans 11:12, 26-27), and plugged-in to assemblies where Jewish Believers can remain in fidelity to their Jewish heritage—not finding themselves assimilated away into a Gentile Christianity, which might see that their grandchildren and great-grandchildren have no comprehension or knowledge of their Jewish ancestry. Secondly, the Messianic movement has witnessed many non-Jewish Believers take a tangible hold of their Hebraic Roots in the Tanach and Jewish Roots in Second Temple Judaism and the Synagogue, in fulfillment of the nations coming to Zion in the end-times to be taught God’s Torah (Micah 4:1-3; Isaiah 2:2-4), recognizing that God is with His Jewish people (Zechariah 8:23).

All of us, as God’s children, should be willing and eager to learn from each other—particularly as there are many godly and edifying virtues from both Judaism and Protestantism, which can definitely be employed as we contemplate the final stages of history before the return of the Messiah. While Jewish and non-Jewish Believers are not exactly the same, and there are natural differences among God’s people—namely that only Jewish Believers can expect to be given a tribal inheritance in the Promised Land, and that the Torah and Tanach composes not just their spiritual but also ethnic and cultural heritage—we have far more in common than not. If we focus on what we have in common, first, then our differences can be used to enrich and aid us in encountering the challenges of life—not encourage suspicion, division, and rivalry.

This December is a season when I get to join with my fellow Jewish brothers and sisters in Messiah Yeshua, and I get to celebrate with them in the triumph of their ancestors over the forces of Antiochus Epiphanes. I consider my commemoration of Chanukah to be no different than when we remember the birth of the State of Israel in 1948, or the retaking of the Old City of Jerusalem in 1967. Chanukah is a celebration of victory. And, in no uncertain terms, do I hide the fact that I think that everyone in the Messianic movement—if they are genuinely committed to the original mission of Jewish outreach, evangelism, and Israel solidarity—should remember the eight days of the Festival of Dedication as well. The Maccabees’ resistance against pagan assimilation, as important as it was for past Jewish history, has much to teach each of us about the future end-times. For, just as Antiochus Epiphanes had demanded that people worship his image, so the coming antimessiah/antichrist will demand that people worship him, and reject the God of Israel and His ways (cf. Revelation 13:4-7).

Four years ago (2012), our family returned to the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex, where we got our original start in the Messianic movement back in 1995-1996. We not only reconnected with our old Messianic Jewish friends, and made some new Messianic Jewish friends, becoming part of a vibrant Messianic Jewish congregation—but we have even been welcomed into positions of leadership and teaching. The biggest “controversy” I have witnessed regarding Chanukah is over who is going to set up, and take down, the decorations in the sanctuary. While improvements can always be made regarding what lessons there are to learn from the Maccabean revolt, I am thankful to report that there are no controversies whatsoever about whether or not we even need to learn from the Maccabean revolt.

Things get much more interesting, however, in my ministry service through Outreach Israel and Messianic Apologetics—because most of what we do actively involves online social media. In open forums, you encounter people from all sorts of religious persuasions, in particular as it involves the many, who in some form or another, associate themselves with the label “Messianic.” To be sure, the significant number of people with whom I interact are Jewish and non-Jewish Believers, who want unity and stability within the Messianic movement, and who want us all to get along, learning from one another. At the same time, when one moves into the more independent Hebrew/Hebraic Roots persuasions, things can get very, very interesting. While I think many of us can understand—especially after the election cycle of 2016—much of the frustration that people have with “the establishment,” some people are so anti-establishment that they are of the mindset that neither Christianity nor Judaism have ever made any significant, positive contribution, of any kind, to human civilization.

The kind of person who has become particularly odious to me, over the past few years, is the non-Jewish “Believer” who claims to be a part of the polity of Israel, but wants little or nothing to do with the Jewish people or with mainline Jewish traditions and customs. Almost all of the non-Jewish Believers I interact with are of the conviction that, along with their fellow Jewish Believers, they are a part of the polity of Israel. They believe that they are a part of what Ephesians 2:11-13 calls the “Commonwealth of Israel,” the Galatians 6:16 “Israel of God,” the Romans 11:16-17 phenomenon of being wild olive branches “grafted-in” to Israel’s olive tree (cf. Jeremiah 11:16-17; Hosea 14:1-7), participants in Israel’s Kingdom restoration along with their fellow Jewish Believers, witnessing David’s Tabernacle being restored (Acts 15:15-18; Amos 9:11-12)—a part of an enlarged Kingdom realm of Israel, with a restored Twelve Tribes at its center, and its dominion welcoming in the righteous from the nations. Many of these people know the horrors resultant of Christian anti-Semitism and replacement theology, and so if they are claiming to be “fellow heirs and fellow members of the body, and fellow partakers of the promise” (Ephesians 3:6), this better be joined with the thrust of Romans 12:10 in mind: “love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honor” (NRSV).

Certainly, if someone like me has a Biblical responsibility to outdo my fellow brothers and sisters in showing honor to them, then what it means is that I have to show an appropriate amount of respect to the spiritual and theological heritage that I have in the Jewish Synagogue. That is, if I really do regard myself as a part of the Commonwealth of Israel. There are things that I have to legitimately learn and appreciate from the Jewish experience with God. My writings to date bear witness to the fact that I have been spiritually and intellectually enriched by not just many of the Jewish writings of the Second Temple period and immediately thereafter, but I have learned immense things from the Jewish struggle the past two centuries, particularly as they involve the rise of Zionism, the Holocaust, and the creation of the State of Israel. I am learning new things all the time from the Jewish experience in history, that everybody needs to especially learn and integrate into their psyche, as we get closer and closer to the Messiah’s return.

As it involves living out a lifestyle of Torah obedience unto God, my writings to date also bear adequate witness that I am very philo-traditional when it comes to mainline Jewish traditions and customs. While I am hardly what one would consider to be “Orthodox,” I do not haphazardly dismiss some of the major traditions and customs practiced in Conservative and Reform Jewish settings. I do not eschew, for example, men wearing a yarmulke or kippah in worship services. I do not have any problem with the Hebrew liturgy at my Messianic congregation’s Shabbat service. I adhere to the longstanding convention since Second Temple times of not speaking the Divine Name YHWH/YHVH in public arenas. Whenever I encounter a Jewish tradition or custom that I do not understand, I expel some effort of investigating it first, before commenting on it, much less dismissing it. For certain, I will encounter Jewish perspectives or practices that I consider non-Biblical and in error—just as I have encountered Protestant perspectives or practices that are non-Biblical and in error. At the same time, the wide majority of Jewish perspectives and conventions I find to be genuinely edifying. Certainly for this December, remembering Chanukah or the Festival of Dedication would be an edifying Jewish practice.

Unfortunately, not everyone with whom I interact throughout the week, shares my commitment to fairness and equity. While I do believe, as someone from an evangelical Protestant background, that there are edifying virtues and perspectives from which today’s Messianic movement can benefit that originate from my Reformed and Wesleyan heritage—the fact is that as a non-Jewish Believer in Israel’s Messiah, I have cast my lot with the Jewish people and the restoration of Israel’s Kingdom. I do not just look to the return of the Messiah and His eventual reign from Jerusalem, but I pay attention to what is happening in modern Israel, and I oppose anti-Semitism when I encounter it. I cannot be arrogant or haughty in regard to the widespread Jewish dismissal of Yeshua, but I have to instead act as a vessel of grace and mercy, and be facilitating a widespread Jewish acceptance of Yeshua (Romans 11:30-31). I have to be very conscientious of the Apostle Paul’s warning, “for if God did not spare the natural branches, He will not spare you, either” (Romans 11:21).

What do you do with a non-Jewish Believer, who legitimately partakes of his or her spiritual heritage in the Scriptures of Israel, considering himself or herself a part of Israel’s Commonwealth or polity, and is looking for the return of the Messiah to Jerusalem—but then wants little or nothing to do with mainline Jewish traditions or customs? Perhaps more education in Second Temple Judaism and Jewish history would be in order. But what about those non-Jewish people who want to claim that they are a part of the community of Israel via their faith in Israel’s Messiah—but then take no interest in the original Messianic mission of Jewish outreach, evangelism, and Israel solidarity? Be aware that these people have made commitments to a live a life of Torah obedience, in emulation of Yeshua and His early followers. They keep Shabbat, the appointed times, and eat a kosher style of diet, among other things. They may even read the weekly Torah portions. No one is saying that being a part of the Messianic movement is only a one-way street for them, as though they are only here to provide various forms of support for Jewish ministry; such people should have their spiritual needs met and questions answered, just as Jewish Believers have their own spiritual needs and unique questions. Yet, while it is to be properly acknowledged and recognized that God has sovereignly drawn many non-Jewish Believers into the Messianic movement, we have a serious problem on our hands if a number of them want little or nothing to do with their fellow Messianic Jewish Believers.

While the Messianic movement is broad and diverse, and there are certainly instances of various Messianic Jewish congregations being unwelcome toward non-Jewish Believers—today in 2016 many Messianic Jewish congregations welcome non-Jewish Believers, provided they are respectful and understanding of various Jewish sensibilities. I have Messianic Jewish friends who have no problem with my family living a life of Torah obedience in emulation of Yeshua the Messiah. Part of it, they understand, is being involved with the Messianic community. Another part of it, they understand, involves the prophecies of the nations coming to Zion to be taught God’s Instruction (Micah 4:1-3; Isaiah 2:2-4). They just want to make sure that we are doing this as a part of the Messianic Jewish experience, and not off on our own. How are we helping see the Romans 11:25-26 trajectory of salvation history come to pass—“until the fullness of the nations has come in; and in this way all Israel will be saved” (PME)? Certainly, if such a mission is to be achieved, it will involve expelling the proper efforts to understand Judaism, accept Messianic Jewish Believers as one’s fellow brothers and sisters, and help declare the Messiah to Jewish people who do not know Him!

How much concern does the widely non-Jewish, Hebrew/Hebraic Roots movement really have for the Messianic Jewish movement which preceded it? While I do not want to be found broad-brushing any group of religious people, in the past several years—especially since our family relocated back to North Texas—legitimate concerns as they involve the original mission of the Messianic movement are not too important for Hebrew Roots aficionados. Recently this past Summer, a video documentary called The Way started circulating around social media, and by this time at the end of 2016, it has probably had hundreds of thousands of views. I have seen The Way several times, as its producers visited a number of Hebrew Roots related conferences, independent home fellowships, and interviewed a wide number of popular teachers, as well as individual people. As I have watched The Way: A Documentary, I have tried to practice a method I learned a long time ago as a political science undergraduate: separate data from noise.

There are many non-Jewish Believers whom the Lord is sincerely stirring to look into parts of the Bible which have remained closed to them. Many are partaking of the Sabbath and appointed times. Many are studying the Torah. Many have a genuine desire to want to live like their Savior, and they are willing to make the sacrifice to do it—which at times can include being spurned by their family, ostracized from their friends, and accused of being cultic from their former pastors and Sunday school teachers. Many non-Jewish Believers, who have been directed by the Holy Spirit to be Torah pursuant in their obedience to our Heavenly Father, have experienced some of the same rejection as Jewish Believers who have been ostracized from their families, considered crazy, and maybe even regarded as dead, for placing their trust in Yeshua of Nazareth. I am blessed to say that in my own family’s experience of being a part of Messianic things, we have come together with our Jewish brothers and sisters in Yeshua, and in getting to know one another—and join in common cause—we have been able to have a reciprocal recognition of the sacrifices we have made to walk this path.

Among the many individuals and couples interviewed in The Way: A Documentary, the common thread was that the Lord was moving on people to dig into the Bible like never before. Many of them were indeed cut off from their faith origins in the Old Testament. Many of them had a sincere desire to want to live like Yeshua. Even though many of these people were rough around the edges, particularly in the newness of their experiences, you could tell that these people were ready and willing—not unlike some of the people who in the early days of the Protestant Reformation, first encountered a Bible. One can tell from The Way: A Documentary, that the numbers of non-Jewish Believers awakening to their faith heritage in Israel’s Scriptures, cannot be ignored or dismissed.

But the producers of The Way: A Documentary made one, very critical mistake. They may have traveled across the United States, to Canada, to Costa Rica, and to the United Kingdom. (I was not expecting them to travel to Israel.) They interviewed many Hebrew Roots teachers, and individuals, couples, and families. They may have attended various Hebrew Roots conferences. But not only did the producers of The Way: A Documentary not bother to attend a single Shabbat service at a local Messianic Jewish congregation, and interview the rabbi—they did not even mention the existence of the Messianic Jewish movement. Even though no religious movement is without its challenges and growing pains and errors at times: there would be no move of non-Jewish Believers embracing their faith heritage in Israel, without first a modern Messianic Jewish movement with origins going back to at least the same time as the emergence of Zionism.

What does some of this say? Was this just an oversight of the producers of The Way: A Documentary? Or, is it reflective of the fact that many non-Jewish Believers who have embraced their Hebrew Roots in the Tanach Scriptures, are not too interested in embracing their Jewish Roots in the Second Temple religion of Yeshua the Messiah and His Jewish Apostles? Even more so, are there non-Jewish Believers—believing themselves to be a part of the Commonwealth of Israel, grafted into the olive tree by faith in Israel’s Messiah—who think that Judaism and the Jewish experience have nothing to teach them about their relationship with the God of Israel, or even just the human experience of encountering and overcoming trials on Earth?

That there is more going on in the Messianic movement than just Jewish evangelism is clear enough. But, to forget and/or dismiss the original vision of Messianic Jewish outreach to Jewish people who need Yeshua the Messiah is a grave sin. The agony of Paul over the salvation of his countrymen needs to be heard: “I could wish myself actually under God’s curse and separated from the Messiah, if it would help my brothers, my own flesh and blood” (Romans 9:3, CJB).

It might take a little more work, but one can be a part of a Messianic movement with a dual mission of Jewish outreach and evangelism and in equipping the non-Jewish Believers God has sovereignly drawn in to be a part of the restoration He is performing. Yet as obvious as it may be to some: you cannot have an authentic restoration of Israel’s Kingdom without the Jews. I am afraid that many presently run the severe risk of being cut off (Romans 11:21).

November 2016 OIM News


OIM Update

November 2016

The last few months have been devoted to prayer, confession, and supplication unlike anytime in my life. For the first time since becoming a Believer, I truly considered the tragic possibility that the country where I reside was going to democratically choose socialism over the free enterprise capitalistic model that was envisioned by the formation of a constitutional republic based on Judeo-Christian principles back in 1787. For weeks on end, particularly as the Election Day approached, every morning as I entered into conscientiousness, I found myself crying out for mercy, mercy, and more mercy from our Heavenly Father. For lack of a better example, I frequently recalled the prayers recorded by the Prophet Daniel, as he recognized the timeline laid out by Jeremiah’s prophecies (Jeremiah 25:11-12; 29:10) and interceded for his fellow Jews in Babylonian exile:

“So I gave my attention to the Lord God to seek Him by prayer and supplications, with fasting, sackcloth and ashes. I prayed to the LORD my God and confessed and said, ‘Alas, O Lord, the great and awesome God, who keeps His covenant and lovingkindness for those who love Him and keep His commandments, we have sinned, committed iniquity, acted wickedly and rebelled, even turning aside from Your commandments and ordinances. Moreover, we have not listened to Your servants the prophets, who spoke in Your name to our kings, our princes, our fathers and all the people of the land. Righteousness belongs to You, O Lord, but to us open shame, as it is this day—to the men of Judah, the inhabitants of Jerusalem and all Israel, those who are nearby and those who are far away in all the countries to which You have driven them, because of their unfaithful deeds which they have committed against You. Open shame belongs to us, O Lord, to our kings, our princes and our fathers, because we have sinned against You. To the Lord our God belong compassion and forgiveness, for we have rebelled against Him; nor have we obeyed the voice of the LORD our God, to walk in His teachings which He set before us through His servants the prophets. Indeed all Israel has transgressed Your law and turned aside, not obeying Your voice; so the curse has been poured out on us, along with the oath which is written in the law of Moses the servant of God, for we have sinned against Him. Thus He has confirmed His words which He had spoken against us and against our rulers who ruled us, to bring on us great calamity; for under the whole heaven there has not been done anything like what was done to Jerusalem’” (Daniel 9:3-12).

Needless to say, I certainly do not believe it was my individual prayers which generated the electoral results—but instead the cumulative effect of the millions of other grieving saints, who likewise cried out to our Creator God with unceasing prayers. In so doing, many were led to confess their sin and the sin of their fathers, and plead and implore the Holy One for mercy and compassion (Leviticus 26:42). Thankfully by His grace, the Almighty One gazed down from His Heavenly throne and recognized that there were indeed, many more than the negotiated ten righteous souls of Sodom (Genesis 18:16-33) residing in the United States, who could continue to fulfill God’s work to take the gospel of truth to the nations of the world.

Nevertheless, from my extremely limited perspective of being dangled over the potential abyss of living in a society substantially turned over to the evil inclinations of humanity—such was a frightening and I hope life altering experience for all those who claim to be a part of the Body of Messiah. Consequently in my moments of intercession, I was led to consider many of the Biblical and historical facts which led us to this critical juncture. I have tried to capture these things in this month’s lead article, “A Cultural Crossroad.” Hopefully, as we move forward and have been given a “line extension” in time to advance God’s Kingdom on Earth, the Messianic movement will continue to mature and flourish in anticipation of the Messiah’s return.

Finally, significant progress continues to be made with Messianic Apologetics expanding its outreach via social media. During the past year, J.K. McKee has made efforts to be quite active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. We appreciate your efforts of partnering with us via our ongoing Technology Fund, as we make upgrades to our computer equipment and abilities. The transfer of information from the old Messianic Apologetics website to the new WordPress based site will be completed by the end of the year. We are also pleased to announce that audio teachings are now available via a new Messianic Apologetics channel on both iTunes and Podomatic, which you can download via your iPhone or Android.

Until the Messianic restoration of all things…

Mark Huey


A Cultural Crossroads

by Mark Huey
mark@outreachisrael.net

For those of us living in the United States, the past few months in anticipation of a national election and a new governmental leadership, have been extremely stressful. The free will choice of the American population, given the reported flaws of the final two candidates, created conflict peppered with angst, as well meaning people sought peace in their constitutional right to cast a vote. Personally, for the first time since the turbulent 1960s, I discerned the possibility that a dramatic cultural shift was about to take place. But unlike the naïve God-less teenager—who fifty years ago relied upon whatever the world system or “power of air” (Ephesians 2:2) was broadcasting into the airwaves to influence public opinion—my current perception was different. Instead, after almost forty years of pursuing the Messiah Yeshua with the indwelling Holy Spirit teaching and comforting my soul (John 14:16, 26; 2 Corinthians 1:3-7), I had been blessed with eyes to see and ears to hear the manifestation of spiritual warfare that the Spirit of God was revealing as Election Day approached. In my opinion, the continuation of the American culture, based on Judeo-Christian principles, was palpably threatened. Hence, I believe we were at a critical cultural crossroad—and my heartfelt concern for the future of our country, as the principal world power established to defend the relatively nascent State of Israel, was unlike any apprehension I had ever experienced before. As a result of the sleep-depriving anxiety—like millions of other Believers witnessing the same state of affairs—my primary reaction was to fervently pray for God’s mercy. As I searched the Scriptures and reflected on world history for how God intervened in other crucial times, the following verses came to mind occasionally—as my pleading, beseeching, and supplicating intercession grew:

“Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard your hearts and your minds in Messiah Yeshua” (Philippians 4:6-7).

In addition to interceding intensely for the direction of our country, the annual trek through the Torah cycle providentially had the Book of Deuteronomy being studied during the waning months of the recent campaign season, along with the commemoration of the Fall high holidays. In many regards, the five books of the Torah of Moses can be considered to function as the written “constitution” of Ancient Israel. Deuteronomy or Devarim as the final book, incorporates Moses’ concluding summary and recapitulation of the statutes, laws, and regulations.

This year, when reading and studying through those summary passages—given the political electoral decisions being made in early November, and the real potential for what many were calling a “constitutional crisis” with certain results—the parallels between what was envisioned by the framers of the U.S. Constitution came to mind often. After all, when the founding documents, including the Constitution of the United States, were being drafted and adopted, a significant number of the framers and authors of those documents were influenced by Christian ethics and moral principles, with many being genuine followers of the Messiah. The indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit was evident in many of the hearts of those used to draft the provisions incorporated in the Constitution of the United States of America.

As a result, the generally agreed upon understanding about the fallen nature of humanity, was addressed by establishing a scheme of government which would incorporate balancing mechanisms to keep any one person from gaining too much power. For most assuredly, from previous experience and knowledge about world history, just about everyone in that era understood the universal principle later encapsulated in Lord Acton’s precise definition about power: “power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Hence, provisions were made in the U.S. Constitution that included what are known as “checks and balances” to prevent any one branch of government, or any one individual, from abusing the power that they were to receive.

Perhaps one of the most disturbing aspects of the Fall campaign was the much discussed realization that genuine corruption within the government of the United States had simply become a given among the ruling class. Light was finally being cast on the misdealing hidden in the darkness. Television commentators railed, articles and books were written, and movies and documentaries were produced—which all delved into many of the challenges that beset the candidates of the two primary parties vying for political power. One of the most ballyhooed claims dealt with what was being called absolute self-dealing and corruption by one of the candidates. The evidence of using power and position to enrich oneself was overwhelming, as the ability to prosecute the case was frozen by the judicial system. Nevertheless, the intensity of the campaign was in full bloom this past September.

As the 229th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution took place on September 17th, the Torah portion Shoftim was being considered. In Deuteronomy 16:18-21:9, I discovered one critical area that the framers of the U.S. Constitution did not include when they were drafting the articles for American governance. After all, the founding fathers of the late Eighteenth Century were essentially successful farmers, traders, professionals, businessmen, bankers, doctors, lawyers, or land owners—who did not necessarily envision the problem that money would or could create in the electoral processes of the early Twenty-First Century. For the most part, those involved in governmental activities considered it temporary service to the nation which had been created, and not a permanent status for life. Nonetheless, they did foresee the need to include a provision for impeachment that addressed the problem of bribery in the following oblique way found in Article 2, Section 4 Impeachment:

The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other High crimes and Misdemeanors.

In other words, “bribery” was something that the framers of our Constitution knew the human heart was capable of falling into—along with treason, high crimes, and misdemeanors. Of course even today, the ability to prosecute someone for any of these misdeeds requires considerable legal arguments, to determine exactly what rises to the level of removal from office.

But as I pondered Shoftim portion, I wondered why there was not more consideration for how officials, magistrates, and judges can be so readily influenced by the bribes of others. Perhaps the founders could have been more explicit when it comes to the corruption that can result from monetary bribes, as noted in this passage that reminds us about how bribes pervert justice:

“You shall appoint for yourself judges and officers in all your towns which the LORD your God is giving you, according to your tribes, and they shall judge the people with righteous judgment. You shall not distort justice; you shall not be partial, and you shall not take a bribe, for a bribe blinds the eyes of the wise and perverts the words of the righteous. Justice, and only justice, you shall pursue, that you may live and possess the land which the LORD your God is giving you” (Deuteronomy 16:18-20).

The difference, found in the Torah, was that the judges and officers would be appointed by the various tribal leaders of Ancient Israel, rather than elected democratically as found in the American Constitution. But the universal principle found in the words that “a bribe blinds the eyes of the wise and perverts the words of the righteous,” must be considered. This takes one right back to the fallen nature of humanity. Without getting into all of the details which have led settled law to the “Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission” Supreme Court decision, suffice it to say that the ability for money (or wealth/mammon) to corrupt humans goes right back in the annals of time. In fact, in His Sermon on the Mount, Yeshua addressed the choice that every person, regardless of whether they seek to be a ruler, judge, or public servant, must contend with in life. It all comes down to who or what every person is going to serve, which according to Yeshua is one of two masters:

“No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth” (Matthew 6:24).

Here in very succinct terms, Yeshua explains the great dilemma presented to every person who has ever lived—but most especially issues a challenge to those who would claim to follow Him. Consider the stark reality that if a person in a governmental position does not claim a relationship with the Risen Savior, which gives knowledgeable access to the Creator God—then their allegiance is either to self, or a plethora of other gods, with the misperceived security derived from the acquisition of wealth as a motivational force. But without judging another person’s heart on where he or she stands before the Almighty, observing the actions of a person versus what one says, should give a perceptive person a good idea about just who or what another individual is serving. This wise warning was mentioned by Yeshua, just after speaking about the choice of masters, with the reminder that His followers need to be self-critical in order to avoid hypocrisy:

“Do not judge so that you will not be judged. For in the way you judge, you will be judged; and by your standard of measure, it will be measured to you. Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye” (Matthew 7:1-5).

So with those words taken to heart, our prayers should be consistent for all who seek to rule over us in governmental positions. We are not to judge their motivations, but ask the Holy One to give them wisdom, discernment, and merciful hearts when it comes to making decisions that impact those under their authority.

This is why another passage in Shoftim made so much sense regarding what the Lord expected the kings of Israel to do when they were in power. Here, the Torah was very explicit on how Moses instructed the eventual kings of Israel to maintain their humility once they were elevated to rule:

“When you enter the land which the LORD your God gives you, and you possess it and live in it, and you say, ‘I will set a king over me like all the nations who are around me,’ you shall surely set a king over you whom the LORD your God chooses, one from among your countrymen you shall set as king over yourselves; you may not put a foreigner over yourselves who is not your countryman. Moreover, he shall not multiply horses for himself, nor shall he cause the people to return to Egypt to multiply horses, since the LORD has said to you, ‘You shall never again return that way.’ He shall not multiply wives for himself, or else his heart will turn away; nor shall he greatly increase silver and gold for himself. Now it shall come about when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself a copy of this law on a scroll in the presence of the Levitical priests. It shall be with him and he shall read it all the days of his life, that he may learn to fear the LORD his God, by carefully observing all the words of this law and these statutes, that his heart may not be lifted up above his countrymen and that he may not turn aside from the commandment, to the right or the left, so that he and his sons may continue long in his kingdom in the midst of Israel” (Deuteronomy 17:14-20).

Of course, these instructions were for the kings of Israel who were beholden to the Torah of Moses. In the case of the American president, the U.S. Constitution is the law of the land. But if you take a brief look at this passage, you will note a few values that could be applied to any person who has been elevated to power over others, even in a constitutional republic based on democratic principles. In fact, some of these principles were discretely incorporated into the text of the Constitution, and others adhered to by many of the Presidents who have presided over the United States of America. These include:

  1. Choose a countryman or someone (born American, no foreign born leaders)
  2. Never return to Egypt or its ways (do not return to European monarchial systems)
  3. Do not take additional wives, and avoid interlocking treaties (ancient entanglement with treaties)
  4. Take money or increase wealth (avoid bribery)
  5. Write the Torah with the priests (understand the Constitution)
  6. Read Torah and its statutes daily (appreciate validity of established laws)
  7. Learn to fear the Lord (grave responsibility)
  8. Maintain humility (daily prayer seeking guidance from above)

As you can see, the influence of the Holy Bible had a profound impact on the formation of the American culture and the writing of the U.S. Constitution. I highly recommend you take the time to read an article by Stephen McDowell, entitled, “Noah Webster, God’s Law, and the United States Constitution: The Influence of the Bible on the Development of American Constitutionalism” (accessible online at: http://providencefoundation.com/?page_id=1948), and you can review the unique trail through the many historical documents, ultimately influenced by the Scriptures, distilled into the U.S. Constitution.

When reading through many of these documents, you will find just how close the American culture came to a critical crossroad which would have had incredibly traumatic consequences for the world we live in today. One quoted paraphrase that really caught my attention, was attributed to some post-presidency letters written by Thomas Jefferson regarding the ability for the young nation to prosper and thrive. In those correspondences Jefferson warned of the detrimental effects of a centralized government, combined with the corruption inherent in political circles. Upon reading these comments and references to them by various editorial writers, the state of affairs surrounding the recent election cycle generated serious concern for the direction our country was going to take. Attempting to weave in various prophetic statements found in the Holy Scriptures, just added to the parlor games being debated by God-fearing people from all spiritual persuasions. Needless to say, because I was more familiar with the Holy Scriptures, I focused my energies on prayer, appealing to God for mercy, and His compassion to a people and a nation that I believe still has a unique calling to stand with the Jewish people and the State of Israel.

Thankfully, by the grace of God, the result which occurred during this election cycle has given many hope for the days, weeks, months, and years ahead. Around our home, we have praised the Lord for what we have called a “line extension,” before the End of the Age trauma commences. Quite frankly, I have no good reason for understanding why the Holy One of Israel had so much grace toward His people, other than the cries for mercy! There is no doubt in my mind that there were untold millions of Believers who followed this Scripture to the letter:

“[A]nd My people who are called by My name humble themselves and pray and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, will forgive their sin and will heal their land” (2 Chronicles 7:14).

Surely, millions of God-fearing Americans humbled themselves, and sought the face of the Almighty in fervent prayer. Many confessed their sin and turned from their wicked ways. As a result, the Holy One heard the pleas and cries from Heaven, forgave the sin, and is now in the process of healing our land, the United States of America.

The American cultural crossroad was upon us. We stopped, paused, considered the alternatives, and by the grace of God, chose to return to a path which adheres to Christian principles much more so than the other choice. Now it is time to pray for unity and healing between those who are diametrically opposed in the worldview that was chosen. And while we are at it, continue to pray for the protection of those in governmental leadership—so that the American culture, based on Judeo-Christian principles, will continue to stand with the State of Israel for the foreseeable future.

Let me close with some of the most poignant words regarding how the Creator God sovereignly places various governmental authorities over people, in order to ultimately accomplish His will for humanity. Here in his writing to the Romans, the Apostle Paul summarized how Believers as citizens of a society should conduct their lives. These are words that I have no doubt were certainly being considered when the U.S. Constitution was agreed upon:

“Every person is to be in subjection to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those which exist are established by God. Therefore whoever resists authority has opposed the ordinance of God; and they who have opposed will receive condemnation upon themselves. For rulers are not a cause of fear for good behavior, but for evil. Do you want to have no fear of authority? Do what is good and you will have praise from the same; for it is a minister of God to you for good. But if you do what is evil, be afraid; for it does not bear the sword for nothing; for it is a minister of God, an avenger who brings wrath on the one who practices evil. Therefore it is necessary to be in subjection, not only because of wrath, but also for conscience’ sake. For because of this you also pay taxes, for rulers are servants of God, devoting themselves to this very thing. Render to all what is due them: tax to whom tax is due; custom to whom custom; fear to whom fear; honor to whom honor. Owe nothing to anyone except to love one another; for he who loves his neighbor has fulfilled the law. For this, ‘You shall not commit adultery, you shall not murder, you shall not steal, you shall not covet’ [Exodus 20:13-15, 17; Deuteronomy 5:17-19], and if there is any other commandment, it is summed up in this saying, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’ [Leviticus 19:18]. Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the law. Do this, knowing the time that it is already the hour for you to awaken from sleep; for now salvation is nearer to us than when we believed. The night is almost gone, and the day is near. Therefore let us lay aside the deeds of darkness and put on the armor of light. Let us behave properly as in the day, not in carousing and drunkenness, not in sexual promiscuity and sensuality, not in strife and jealousy. But put on the Lord Yeshua the Messiah, and make no provision for the flesh in regard to its lusts” (Romans 13:1-14).

When you reflect on Paul’s words, in light of the cultural crossroad just reached and the path chosen—all who believe in the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob because of faith in the accomplished work of the Messiah Yeshua should say without reservation: “Hallelujah!” We have seen prayers answered, and accordingly, need to take the reprieve as an opportunity to “put on the Lord Messiah Yeshua, and stop making provision for the flesh—for its cravings” (Romans 13:14, TLV)—so that we might instead further advance God’s Kingdom on Earth, until the Messianic restoration of all things…

October 2016 OIM News


OIM Update

October 2016

As the Fall feasts of the Lord arrived this month, a variety of personal, providential circumstances during the month of Elul could not be ignored. Unexpectedly, the impetus for this series of events began with a bicycle accident that interrupted my 5 or 6 day-per-week eighteen-mile bike ride, designed to burn calories and get a good cardio workout. Thankfully, a broken collarbone from the accident ended up revealing some serious blockage in my heart arteries, during the pre-operation phase, delaying surgery to repair the break. So, during this season of repentance from the first of Elul through Yom Kippur, I have had some time to seriously reflect on not only my heart’s physical condition, but most importantly the intentions and motivations of my spiritual heart.

Initially, while praying about my broken bone—before discovering the arteriostenosis in my heart—I was led to some of the Psalms of King David which speak about how fearfully and wonderfully human beings are made in their mother’s womb:

“For You formed my inward parts; You wove me in my mother’s womb. I will give thanks to You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; wonderful are Your works, and my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from You, when I was made in secret, and skillfully wrought in the depths of the earth; Your eyes have seen my unformed substance; and in Your book were all written the days that were ordained for me, when as yet there was not one of them” (Psalm 139:13-16).

After the discovery of my heart blockage, the focus of my prayers soon added the heart of flesh which was given to me when I was born from above (Ezekiel 11:19; 36:26):

“For I will take you from the nations, gather you from all the lands and bring you into your own land. Then I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be clean; I will cleanse you from all your filthiness and from all your idols. Moreover, I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; and I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. I will put My Spirit within you and cause you to walk in My statutes, and you will be careful to observe My ordinances. You will live in the land that I gave to your forefathers; so you will be My people, and I will be your God” (Ezekiel 36:24-28).

Despite the indwelling power of the Holy Spirit, I was reminded that my heart of flesh still struggles with the old nature, which at times can return even as the sanctification process proceeds. During this present season of repentance, passages like the following came to mind:

“Search me, O God, and know my heart; try me and know my anxious thoughts; and see if there be any hurtful way in me, and lead me in the everlasting way” (Psalm 139:23-24).

This past month, I was invited by a good friend to attend an evangelical Christian men’s retreat via the auspices of the Tres Dias movement, which just happened to conclude on Yom Teruah/Rosh HaShanah. The timing was perfect for this season of reflection, and so I joyfully attended the three day retreat. As a result of the confluence of all these events, I was prompted to write this month’s lead article entitled, “A Messianic Heart,” in order to share what the Lord was showing me through this confluence of circumstances.

Significant progress continues to be made with Messianic Apologetics expanding its outreach via social media. During the past year, J.K. McKee has made efforts to be quite active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. We appreciate your efforts of partnering with us via our ongoing Technology Fund, as we make upgrades to our computer equipment and abilities. This past month, the transfer of information from the old Messianic Apologetics website to the new WordPress based site steadily continues. We are also pleased to announce that audio teachings are now available via a new Messianic Apologetics channel on both iTunes and Podomatic, which you can download via your iPhone or Android.

Advancing His Kingdom, until the restoration of all things…

Mark Huey


A Messianic Heart

by Mark Huey
mark@outreachisrael.net

In recent weeks, circumstances surrounding the physical condition of my heart have led me to research not only information on coronary heart disease, but have also prompted me to consider what it means to have a “Messianic heart” for the Creator God. While it has been enlightening to learn about the physiology of how a physical heart functions and how arteries can become blocked, it has been much more profitable to search my spiritual heart and seek the Lord’s face during the annual season of repentance from the first of Elul to Yom Kippur. Providentially, during those forty days I was introduced to a ministry which displayed unconditional love to the attendees of a three day retreat that concluded on Yom Teruah/Rosh HaShanah or the Feast of Trumpets. The timing “coincidences” were much too obvious for me to ignore. So with renewed vigor from dodging a potential tragedy of a “widow maker” termination of my physical life, the thought of what it means to truly have a Messianic heart, or a heart like Yeshua the Messiah, came frequently into my mind.

Quite frankly, because I have never desired to be a cardiologist, but instead, have devoted a considerable amount of time throughout the past forty or so years to read and study the Holy Bible—I am much more comfortable seeking insight on “the heart” from God’s Word, rather than medical journals. After all, I know that the heart muscle is merely an organ created to pump blood throughout the circulatory system. But since the Hebrew terms for heart, lev and levav, are mentioned nearly 1,000 times in the Tanakh, and the Greek term kardia some 157 times in the Apostolic Writings, in many ways, the Holy Scriptures can be considered a heart manual. I concluded that I could personally gain much more from using this personal “wake up” call to search my own heart, to ascertain if I had the “heart of Messiah,” and was over time being conformed more to His image (Romans 8:29). For most assuredly, the Jewish tradition during the annual forty-day season of repentance accentuated by the Ten Days of Awe culminating on Yom Kippur, is an opportune time to ask the Holy One to search our own hearts, as was emphasized and modeled to Israel by King David and recorded in these Psalms:

“Examine me, O LORD, and try me; test my mind and my heart. For Your lovingkindness is before my eyes, and I have walked in Your truth” (Psalm 26:2-3).

“Search me, O God, and know my heart; try me and know my anxious thoughts; and see if there be any hurtful way in me, and lead me in the everlasting way” (Psalm 139:23-24).

Needless to say, the memory bank of Scriptures which included the word “heart” flooded my mind, as I sought the Father’s face for answers to the many questions I had about my own heart—but most especially the motivations that came forth from within my heart. Of course, many of the Scripture passages which deal with the heart are found in the Psalms and words of King David, who according to Samuel’s comments to King Saul, was a “man after God’s own heart”:

“Samuel said to Saul, ‘You have acted foolishly; you have not kept the commandment of the LORD your God, which He commanded you, for now the LORD would have established your kingdom over Israel forever. But now your kingdom shall not endure. The LORD has sought out for Himself a man after His own heart [ish k’levavo], and the LORD has appointed him as ruler over His people, because you have not kept what the LORD commanded you” (1 Samuel 13:13-14).

One discovers in the interactions between the Prophet Samuel and King Saul, that the young David, who is eventually anointed king over Israel, is not chosen for his appearance or stature. Rather, from the Lord’s perspective—as One who looked upon David’s heart—David was chosen for qualities that only God Himself could truly see:

“But the LORD said to Samuel, ‘Do not look at his appearance or at the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for God sees not as man sees, for man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart’” (1 Samuel 16:7).

The choice by the Holy One to make David the king over Israel—with David notably being a progenitor of the Messiah, the ultimate Son of David—is quite curious, given the testimony found in Scripture about David’s imperfect life. Yet, one can get a glimpse of David’s heart from the wealth of Psalms he composed, where he poured out his heart to the Lord. Perhaps the thing about David’s heart which indicated a strong desire to please God, is the consistent communion that reflected a sincere yearning to repent of anything which impeded his relationship with Him. David’s remorseful and repentant heart can be found in Psalms 32 and 51, purportedly after David was caught in his sin with Bathsheba. When you read these Psalms, hear David’s heart and his desire for restoration, knowing that the Lord had every right to turn His face away and bring just punishment for the iniquities he committed:

A Psalm of David. A Maskil. How blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered! How blessed is the man to whom the Lord does not impute iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no deceit! When I kept silent about my sin, my body wasted away through my groaning all day long. For day and night Your hand was heavy upon me; My vitality was drained away as with the fever heat of summer. Selah. I acknowledged my sin to You, and my iniquity I did not hide; I said, ‘I will confess my transgressions to the LORD’; and You forgave the guilt of my sin. Selah. Therefore, let everyone who is godly pray to You in a time when You may be found; surely in a flood of great waters they will not reach him. You are my hiding place; You preserve me from trouble; You surround me with songs of deliverance. Selah. I will instruct you and teach you in the way which you should go; I will counsel you with My eye upon you. Do not be as the horse or as the mule which have no understanding, whose trappings include bit and bridle to hold them in check, otherwise they will not come near to you. Many are the sorrows of the wicked, but he who trusts in the LORD, lovingkindness shall surround him. Be glad in the LORD and rejoice, you righteous ones; and shout for joy, all you who are upright in heart” (Psalm 32:1-11).

“For the choir director. A Psalm of David, when Nathan the prophet came to him, after he had gone in to Bathsheba. Be gracious to me, O God, according to Your lovingkindness; according to the greatness of Your compassion blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity and cleanse me from my sin. For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me. Against You, You only, I have sinned and done what is evil in Your sight, so that You are justified when You speak and blameless when You judge. Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin my mother conceived me. Behold, You desire truth in the innermost being, and in the hidden part You will make me know wisdom. Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Make me to hear joy and gladness, let the bones which You have broken rejoice. Hide Your face from my sins and blot out all my iniquities. Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me. Do not cast me away from Your presence and do not take Your Holy Spirit from me. Restore to me the joy of Your salvation and sustain me with a willing spirit. Then I will teach transgressors Your ways, and sinners will be converted to You. Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, the God of my salvation; then my tongue will joyfully sing of Your righteousness. O Lord, open my lips, that my mouth may declare Your praise. For You do not delight in sacrifice, otherwise I would give it; You are not pleased with burnt offering. the sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and a contrite heart, O God, You will not despise. By Your favor do good to Zion; build the walls of Jerusalem. Then You will delight in righteous sacrifices, in burnt offering and whole burnt offering; then young bulls will be offered on Your altar” (Psalm 51:1-19).

When you read and meditate upon these Psalms and other Psalms of repentance (such as Psalms 6; 38; 102; 130; 143), you find that being honest with the Holy One of Israel is imperative for revealing the inconsistencies in our hearts. The Lord wants His people to be honest with themselves, and totally transparent with Him in order to receive the forgiveness He freely offers—despite the natural condition of the heart before one is born from above, as noted by the Prophet Jeremiah:

“The heart is more deceitful than all else and is desperately sick; who can understand it?” (Jeremiah 17:9).

However for whatever reasons, despite his recorded sin, King David modeled a significant method of returning to the Almighty, and had a “Messianic heart” which desperately desired communion and intimacy with His Maker throughout his life. Certainly this stellar attribute is one of the primary reasons that the Holy One chose David to be a major ancestor of Yeshua the Messiah.

When one fast forwards to the post-resurrection time, after the early Believers were indwelt with the Holy Spirit, there is some absolute confirmation of this approach to the Holy One by the Apostle John. He succinctly summarizes the need to recognize and admit or confess one’s sin, with the confident knowledge that people will be forgiven and cleansed from all unrighteousness:

“If we say that we have fellowship with Him and yet walk in the darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth; but if we walk in the Light as He Himself is in the Light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Yeshua His Son cleanses us from all sin. If we say that we have no sin, we are deceiving ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say that we have not sinned, we make Him a liar and His word is not in us” (1 John 1:6-10).

There are some serious questions for modern-day Believers who have been given a heart of flesh, and indwelt with the power of the Holy Spirit as promised in Ezekiel 36:26-27:

“Moreover, I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; and I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. I will put My Spirit within you and cause you to walk in My statutes, and you will be careful to observe My ordinances” (Ezekiel 36:26-27).

These questions might include:

  • Do I sincerely want to be a man or woman after God’s own heart?
  • Do I want a “Messianic heart” like King David?
  • Am I willing to be honest with myself (and God), and confess my sin?
  • Am I going to repent of my sin and return to the Holy One with all my heart, soul, mind, and strength?
  • Am I more “Messiah like” (conformed to Yeshua’s image) today than I was a year ago?

One way to ascertain progress on the road to sanctification in the Messiah, is by listening or recalling what comes out of the mouth in conversations, and at different times when the emotions are moved. There is a significant by Yeshua in the Gospel of Matthew that gets to the core substance of the matter. When one truly remembers what words have come out of the mouth over the past year, one should be able to discern the condition of his or her heart. In so doing, one might need to choose to continually circumcise the heart, and stiffen the neck no longer (Deuteronomy 10:16). Here is how Yeshua explained to the religious people of His era what they needed to hear, in order to truly understand the hardness of their hearts and their own self-deception:

“Then some Pharisees and scribes came to Yeshua from Jerusalem and said, ‘Why do Your disciples break the tradition of the elders? For they do not wash their hands when they eat bread.’ And He answered and said to them, ‘Why do you yourselves transgress the commandment of God for the sake of your tradition? For God said, “Honor your father and mother” [Exodus 20:12; Deuteronomy 5:16], and, “He who speaks evil of father or mother is to be put to death” [Exodus 21:17; Leviticus 20:9]. But you say, “Whoever says to his father or mother, ‘Whatever I have that would help you has been given to God,’ he is not to honor his father or his mother.” And by this you invalidated the word of God for the sake of your tradition. You hypocrites, rightly did Isaiah prophesy of you: “This people honors Me with their lips, but their heart is far away from Me. But in vain do they worship Me, teaching as doctrines the precepts of men”’ [Isaiah 29:13, LXX]. After Yeshua called the crowd to Him, He said to them, ‘Hear and understand. It is not what enters into the mouth that defiles the man, but what proceeds out of the mouth, this defiles the man.’ Then the disciples came and said to Him, ‘Do You know that the Pharisees were offended when they heard this statement?’ But He answered and said, ‘Every plant which My heavenly Father did not plant shall be uprooted. Let them alone; they are blind guides of the blind. And if a blind man guides a blind man, both will fall into a pit.’ Peter said to Him, ‘Explain the parable to us.’ Yeshua said, ‘Are you still lacking in understanding also? Do you not understand that everything that goes into the mouth passes into the stomach, and is eliminated? But the things that proceed out of the mouth come from the heart, and those defile the man. For out of the heart come evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, slanders. These are the things which defile the man; but to eat with unwashed hands does not defile the man’” (Matthew 15:1-20).

In this unvarnished explanation to His Disciples, Yeshua detailed how the heart of people can be literally heard in the very words men or women utter. But rather than remember what others have said, think back to the words which have come out of your own mouth that have revealed some hardness of the heart toward others. This introspective self-analysis can be extremely beneficial, if one is truly honest. If there is some recollection of hateful or impure thoughts which manifested as actual words ushering forth from the mouth, then follow the example of King David or the Apostle John. Confess the sin, confident that the Lord will forgive and cleanse the repentant heart from all unrighteousness. If some words were directed at someone within earshot, then take the time to humble yourself and ask the offended person for forgiveness. You will be amazed by the reception of others who might have taken an offense to something which was said inappropriately or in the heat of the moment. In many regards, this exercise will be strengthening your resolve to have a “Messianic heart” that is committed to loving others unconditionally.

Additionally, noting that confessing our sin one to another is beneficial (James 5:16) for physical health and the well-being of the soul, it is also imperative to have a Messianic heart that forgives others for any offense which has been received. Yeshua’s instructions found in Matthew 18 on how to confront others in sin, or resolve conflict between His followers, is concluded by some thoughtful instructions on how to forgive others for any offense they may have committed against another personally. In the summation of the need to forgive from the heart, Yeshua utilizes human examples to emphasize the ultimate forgiveness available from our Heavenly Father:

“Then Peter came and said to Him, ‘Lord, how often shall my brother sin against me and I forgive him? Up to seven times?’ Yeshua said to him, ‘I do not say to you, up to seven times, but up to seventy times seven. For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves. When he had begun to settle them, one who owed him ten thousand talents was brought to him. But since he did not have the means to repay, his lord commanded him to be sold, along with his wife and children and all that he had, and repayment to be made. So the slave fell to the ground and prostrated himself before him, saying, “Have patience with me and I will repay you everything.” And the lord of that slave felt compassion and released him and forgave him the debt. But that slave went out and found one of his fellow slaves who owed him a hundred denarii; and he seized him and began to choke him, saying, “Pay back what you owe.” So his fellow slave fell to the ground and began to plead with him, saying, “Have patience with me and I will repay you.” But he was unwilling and went and threw him in prison until he should pay back what was owed. So when his fellow slaves saw what had happened, they were deeply grieved and came and reported to their lord all that had happened. Then summoning him, his lord said to him, “You wicked slave, I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. Should you not also have had mercy on your fellow slave, in the same way that I had mercy on you?” And his lord, moved with anger, handed him over to the torturers until he should repay all that was owed him. My heavenly Father will also do the same to you, if each of you does not forgive his brother from your heart” (Matthew 18:21-35).

From these few examples, one witnesses how a Messianic heart—one after God’s own heart—confesses sin, seeks forgiveness from sin, repents of sin, and forgives others of sin. Given the intrinsic fallen nature that human beings have inherited from Adam, the only way to overcome our lost estate is to be born from above (John 3:16), and receive the indwelling power of the Holy Spirit. Born again people receive a new heart of flesh that has God’s Torah written upon it as promised in the New Covenant (Jeremiah 31:31-34; Ezekiel 36:25-27). As the Apostle Paul communicated it to the Corinthians, if this monumental transformation has taken place, then people can be regarded as new creatures in the Messiah, serving as His ambassadors with a ministry of reconciliation toward their fellow human beings:

“Therefore from now on we recognize no one according to the flesh; even though we have known Messiah according to the flesh, yet now we know Him in this way no longer. Therefore if anyone is in Messiah, he is a new creature; the old things passed away; behold, new things have come. Now all these things are from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Messiah and gave us the ministry of reconciliation, namely, that God was in Messiah reconciling the world to Himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and He has committed to us the word of reconciliation. Therefore, we are ambassadors for Messiah, as though God were making an appeal through us; we beg you on behalf of Messiah, be reconciled to God. He made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, so that we might become the righteousness of God in Him” (2 Corinthians 5:16-21).

Imagine being the “righteousness of God” in the Messiah, simply because of faith in His accomplished work at Golgotha. If God has forgiven us of our sin, how much more should we forgive others—who whether deliberately or inadvertently, sin against us? But in order to do so, followers of the Messiah must have a Messianic heart that exudes unconditional love without reservation.

Let me conclude these thoughts about a Messianic heart with some words issued by the Apostle Paul, another redeemed sinner, who like King David, was forgiven the sin of murder (Acts 22:4). In his letter to the Philippians are some comments which have always prompted me to continually strive to be everything God has created me to be in the Messiah. In this passage, after earlier in the epistle describing the ultimate humility epitomized by the Lord Yeshua (Philippians 2:5-11), Paul confesses his own lack of confidence in his background and natural abilities:

“More than that, I count all things to be loss in view of the surpassing value of knowing Messiah Yeshua my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them but rubbish so that I may gain Messiah, and may be found in Him, not having a righteousness of my own derived from the Law, but that which is through faith in Messiah, the righteousness which comes from God on the basis of faith, that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death; in order that I may attain to the resurrection from the dead. Not that I have already obtained it or have already become perfect, but I press on so that I may lay hold of that for which also I was laid hold of by Messiah Yeshua. Brethren, I do not regard myself as having laid hold of it yet; but one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and reaching forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Messiah Yeshua. Let us therefore, as many as are perfect, have this attitude; and if in anything you have a different attitude, God will reveal that also to you; however, let us keep living by that same standard to which we have attained” (Philippians 3:8-16).

Instead of relying upon his own strength and human abilities, Paul encourages every Believer to heed his words: “The righteousness that I have comes from knowing Messiah, the power of his resurrection, and the participation in his sufferings. It includes being conformed to his death” (Philippians 3:10, Common English Bible). Paul’s exhortation is to develop a heart just like the Messiah, by continually focusing one’s attention on that goal. Achieving that goal is a lifelong process which comes through pursuing Him with all of one’s heart, mind, soul, and strength on a regular basis. In the annual season of repentance, Messiah followers have ample time to spend reflecting on many aspects of where their hearts are located. If we discover some areas of hardness which need confession, do so believing that forgiveness is available, and that reconciliation with the Father is attainable. If we need to resolve differences with others, do so with a cheerful heart, knowing that this is a part of the ministry of reconciliation that pleases our Heavenly Father. Look to Him and Him alone for the results of any of these acts of humility and contrition.

I am so very thankful for the recent circumstances which have led me to consider just where my heart is Messianic or Messiah-like, and where it is falling short of the goal. I praise my Heavenly Father for being so merciful to me, and orchestrating all of the circumstances of the past month to help me focus on where I currently am in my walk with the Messiah! My prayer is that in so doing, some of the things stated above and the Scriptures cited may be used by the Holy Spirit to inspire others to take the time to take a spiritual inventory on where they are in regard to obtaining a Messianic heart. Hopefully in your own sincere examination, many hearts will be changed for the better, so that whatever heartbeats remain in our numbered days, they will be spent diligently working to advance His Kingdom, until the Messianic restoration of all things…